MENU

Ellen Houston

Visiting Assistant Professor of International Studies
  • Ellen Houston
    Ellen Houston

Professor Houston has taught for Marymount Manhattan College since 2006 as both a full-time and adjunct lecturer. She returns to MMC for the Spring 2018 semester as Visiting Assistant Professor of International Studies. Her specialization in international development and professional work as a consultant in the United Nations system has brought her around the globe as both researcher and policy specialist. 

As the UN system began preparing for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in the late 2000s, Professor Houston was a leading author on a background paper on Gender and Climate Change, putting together early evidence of impacts of a warming climate for women in developing countries. More recently, her research has focused on global commodity issues, particularly how the drive to modernize agriculture in Sub-Saharan Africa is negatively impacting small-scale women farmers and food security.

In her time at the UN, Ellen’s position was thematic, focusing on economic security and rights with much of her work in Asia and Africa, working mainly on gender and women’s empowerment, feminization of poverty and livelihoods in Africa, human trafficking in South Asia, and women working in export processing zones throughout Asia countries.

Professor Houston is a member of the Allied Social Sciences Association (ASSA), Committee on the Status of Women in the Economic Profession (CSWEP), International Association of Feminist Economists (IAFFE), Society for International Development (SID), Union of Radical and Political Economists (URPE), and the Women’s Foreign Policy Group of the Foreign Policy Association.

Title/Position

Visiting Assistant Professor of International Studies

Department

International Studies

Email

ehouston@mmm.edu

Phone

646-393-4137

Degree(s)

The New School for Social Research, Masters of Science, Economics 

University of Denver, Bachelor of Arts, International Studies

Research

Journal Articles

“The High Road and the Low Road to International Competitiveness: Extending the Neo-Schumpeterian Trade Model Beyond Technology” co-authored with Will Milberg, Review of Applied International Economics, Vol. 19, No. 2, 137-162, April 2005

Books and Reports

Immigration Reform:  Will a New Guest Worker Program Hurt Native-born Workers and Minorities?  Report co-authored with Enrico Marcelli.  Center for Community Change Report (June 2005)

Could Legalization Matter for Minorities?  Estimating the Effects of Amnesty on Wages and

Employment of Native-born Workers.  Report co-authored with Enrico Marcelli.  Center for Community Change Report (April 2005)

A Resource Guide to Crime and Work (2002), Economic Policy Institute Report, Washington, D.C. 

Crime and Work:  What Can We Learn From The Low-Wage Labor Market (2000). Report co-author with Jared Bernstein, Economic Policy Institute Report, Washington, DC.

Power, Employment and Accumulation: Social Structures in Economic Theory and Practice

(2000). Book co-edited with Jim Stanford and Lance Taylor, M.E. Sharpe, New York.

Book Chapters 

“Demand Shifts and Earning Inequality: Wages and Hours Growth by Occupation in the US,

1970-97,” co-author with David Howell, in Power, Employment and Accumulation: Social

Structures in Economic Theory and Practice (2000), edited by J. Stanford, E. Houston, and L. Taylor, M.E. Sharpe.

Office Hours

Spring 2018

Thursdays, 2:00-4:00pm

& by appointment

Location

The Faculty Center 100