Full Time Faculty Handbook

2022- 2023 Edition 

I. History and Mission 

History
Mission
Liberal Learning
Accreditation
College Seal, Motto & Mascot

II. Organizational Structure

Administration
Duties and Responsibilities of Division Chair
Selection of Division Chairs
Duties and Responsibilities of Department Chair   
Selection of Department Chairs  
Duties and Responsibilities of Program Coordinators  
Selection of Program Coordinators   
Officers of the Faculty Council

III. Academic Structure

Chairs and Program Coordinators

IV. Curriculum Planning and Student Learning Assessment  

Curriculum Planning  
Student Learning Assessment   
Learning Goals (General Education)
Learning Goals (Majors/Programs)  
Academic Divisions: Course Differentiation Characteristics  

V(a). Academic Policies Specific to Faculty

Annual Review of Tenure-Track Faculty with the VPAA/Dean 
Statement on Academic Freedom  
Attendance at Faculty Council Meetings, Baccalaureate and Commencement  
Courtesy Appointment Policies and Procedures  
Financial Conflicts of Interest Policy for Faculty and Staff
Policy on Course Releases Related to Grants 
Policy on Faculty Files  
Observation Guidelines for Tenure-Track Faculty 
Policy on Responsible Conduct of Research   
Statement on Professional Ethics
Research with Human Subjects  
Syllabi Distribution Policy
Teaching Excellence Award   

V(b). Academic Policies Specific to Students

Academic Honesty Policy  
Academic Standards and Policies 
Accommodations for Students with Disabilities
Attendance   
Credit Hour Policy  
Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) 
Grades
Overtallies and Wait List 
Prior Learning Assessment 

VI. Procedures for Faculty

Alcoholic Beverages
Absence from Class
Attendance/Reporting Non-Attendance (EDNAR)
Audio/Video Equipment (How to Request)
Access to Classrooms  
Admittance to the MMC Campus
Class Rosters
Classroom Guests and Visitors
Contact Information
Contracts 
Course Cancellations
Academic Alert Notification  
End-of-Term Course Evaluations   

Faculty-Led Travel Course
Emergency Procedures
 
Faculty Development Funds
Graffiti
Grade Submission   
Letter of Agreement (Adjunct faculty only)
Mailboxes/Mailroom  
Military Leave Policy 
MMC OneCard, Email and Network Account   
Multi-Purpose Machines  
Payroll
School Closings  
Submitting Your Course Syllabus  
Textbooks and Other Required Books   

 

VII. Resources and Facilities

College Facilities
Campus Resources 

VIII. College Policies

Americans with Disabilities Act
Assistance Animals for Employees with Disabilities
Benefits
Conflicts of Interest Policy for Faculty and Staff
Discrimination and Harassment Policy  
Domestic Violence Policy
Drug-Free Workplace  
Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action  
Gifts and Gratuities   
Guidelines for Approval of Published Materials   
Hate/Bias Crimes  
Immigration Reform and Control Act  
Inclusivity Statement  
Parental/Caregiver Leave Policy
Paid Family Leave
Policy on Sexual Misconduct, Sexual Assault, Stalking and Relationship Violence  
Policy Prohibiting Relationships between College Employees and Students 
Smoking 
Standards of Conduct 
Tuition Exchange Program
Violence in the Workplace 
Policy for Reporting Dishonest or Fraudulent Behavior 
Rights to Nursing Mothers to Express Breast Milk in Workplace Lactation Room Policy
Policy for Inclement Weather or Other School Closures/Delays

IX. Appendix

Download PDF Appendix

Section I: History and Mission

Liberal Learning

Marymount Manhattan College endorses the Statement on Liberal Learning prepared by the Association of American Colleges and Universities, which describes a liberal education as    one  that prepares us to live responsible, productive, and creative lives in a dramatically changing world. It is an education that fosters a well-grounded intellectual resilience, a disposition toward lifelong learning, and an acceptance of responsibility for the ethical consequences of our ideas and actions. Liberal education requires that we understand the foundations of knowledge and inquiry about nature, culture, and society; that we master core skills of perception, analysis, and expression; that we cultivate a respect for truth; that we recognize the importance of historical and cultural context; and that we explore connections among formal learning, citizenship, and service to our communities.”  

As a college located in the heart of New York City, Marymount Manhattan College seeks to promote the intellectual, artistic, ethical, and social development of each student through a curriculum that emphasizes the connections among the arts and sciences, and through the exploration of these connections on our campus in New York City.  

As a student-centered college, MMC seeks to graduate individuals who are thoughtful, articulate, and curious. The College promotes intellectual, artistic, and scientific achievement, critical  thinking, civic engagement, and personal growth. Through its faculty, course offerings, co-curricular activities, and special events, the College fosters a capacity for lifelong learning that is the hallmark of the liberal arts. MMC graduates are given the tools to adapt their knowledge, skills, and sense of responsibility to new settings and challenges. They can communicate effectively, as well as express themselves creatively. They are able to make the connections between human nature and values, the physical world, societies and the histories and structures of particular civilizations, the literary arts, and the fine and performing arts. Marymount Manhattan College remains committed to the values of liberal learning and academic freedom, and the principles of intellectual, scientific, and creative inquiry.  

MMC believes that a liberal education, with its characteristic emphasis on critical thinking, written and oral communication, historical awareness, and creative expression, best prepares students for the twenty-first century.  

 

 

 Accreditation 

Marymount Manhattan College (MMC) is an independent four-year college chartered to grant degrees by the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York. MMC is an accredited institution and a member of the Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE).

MSCHE is an institutional accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). MMC’s accreditation status is Non-Compliance Warning. The Commission’s most recent action on MMC’s accreditation status, on June 23, 2022, was to warn the institution. The College’s Statement of Accreditation Status is maintained on the MSCHE website.

MMC is a member of numerous organizations concerned with the advancement of higher education, including the Association of American Colleges and Universities, the Council of Independent Colleges, the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, and the Commission of Independent Colleges and Universities. The College is also a member of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities and The College Board.


Section II: Organizational Structure

 

Administration  

Board of Trustees 

The Board of Trustees is responsible for the development of the College and the maintenance of conditions that contribute to the welfare of students and the effectiveness of the faculty and administration. The Board establishes the policies of the College, works to support its academic achievements, oversees its finances, authorizes and supervises the expansion of programs, consults with and advises the President of the College, and, when necessary, acts as a final court of appeals in decisions involving the dismissal of members of the faculty or student body.   

The Board is responsible for making all final decisions concerning faculty promotion and tenure, acting in consultation with the President of the College and based upon the recommendation of the Vice President for Academic Affairs/Dean of the Faculty and the Committee on Promotion and Tenure. Trustees are selected  based on  their interest in the College, their areas of expertise, and their commitment to participating on the Board  to  enable the College to fulfill its purpose and mission.  

The President of the College 

The chief administrative officer of the College is the President, who is responsible to the Board of Trustees for the overall management of the College. The President also serves as a member of the Board of Trustees.  

The President’s major responsibilities include the following: making faculty appointments and setting faculty duties; preparing annual budgets; signing and delivering diplomas for academic and honorary degrees; establishing individual salaries based on a salary scale agreed on by the Board of Trustees; and exercising the final authority on internal affairs of the College.  

Vice Presidents 

On the recommendation of the President, the Board of Trustees may appoint one or more Vice Presidents to supervise the respective administrative divisions of the College. At present, there are Vice Presidents for Academic Affairs, Finance and Administration, Institutional Advancement, and Student Success and Engagement 

The Academic Dean 

The Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty (VPAA/Dean) is responsible to the President for the development and administration of the College’s academic programs and is the chief academic officer of the College. The Academic Dean promotes the intellectual development of faculty and students; reviews current and future faculty needs; facilitates academic fund-raising efforts; submits recommendations to the President for the employment, promotion or dismissal of faculty members; and ensures that all rules affecting the fulfillment of academic requirements are carried out. The work of the VPAA/Dean is supported by several Deans and administrative Directors. 

The Division Chair 

The Division Chair oversees the academic programs and activities within the division and reports to the VPAA/Dean. In consultation with the faculty, the VPAA/Dean recommends the appointment of a Division Chair to the President. In most cases, Division Chairs will be full-time tenured faculty members and typically will be appointed for a period of three years. Chairs may be reappointed by the President after appropriate consultation with the VPAA/Dean and the divisional faculty. Division Chairs receive a 2-course release during each of the fall and spring semesters and receive a stipend for the summer.  

The Department Chair 

A Department Chair, who collaborates with the Division Chair, is appointed to manage programs of study that support a major and result in the awarding of a degree. In consultation with the faculty, the Division Chair recommends the appointment of a Department Chair to the VPAA/Dean for a term that serves the needs of the department. Department Chairs may be reappointed by the VPAA/Dean after appropriate consultation with the Division Chair and faculty.  

The Program Coordinator 

Programs that support coursework leading to the completion of a minor or the completion of requirements in the general education curriculum are managed by a Program Coordinator   who   collaborates with the Division Chair. In consultation with the faculty and the VPAA/Dean, the Division Chair appoints the Program Coordinator for a term that serves the department/program. Program Coordinators may be reappointed by the Division Chair after appropriate consultation with the faculty and the VPAA/Dean.  

 

Duties and Responsibilities of Division Chair 

Administration 

  1. Works closely with the VPAA/Dean and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs to implement the strategic plan of the college.  
  2. Seeks out opinions and strives for consensus among divisional faculty to arrive at a representative voice.  
  3. Communicates to divisional faculty the work of the Academic Policy Committee and represents the voice of divisional faculty at Academic Policy Committee meetings.  
  4. Coordinates the work of various Department Chairs, Program Coordinators and other administrative positions within the division.  
  5. Supervises the division office and the staff including the work-study students.  
  6. Prepares agenda for and presides over all divisional meetings. Forwards the minutes of all divisional meetings to the VPAA/Dean and the faculty of the division.  
  7. Manages the faculty advisement process in the division including faculty advisement assignments; orients faculty members to the advisement process, and when needed, resolves advisement/graduation problems in conjunction with Advisement and the Registrar.  
  8. Recruits appropriate faculty for review of students’ Prior Learning Assessment applications.  
  9. Prepares, in consultation with the divisional faculty, recommendations for the revision of departmental objectives, academic programs and course descriptions for the catalog, in harmony with the mission/strategic plan.  
  10. Maintains and reviews all appropriate records of the division, including collection and review of syllabi for all divisional courses.  
  11. Mediates student and faculty complaints as appropriate.  
  12. Attends selected events as divisional representative (e.g., open houses, new faculty reception, graduation, Honors events, reception for accepted students).  
  13. Collaborates with the Office of Institutional Advancement to promote the reputation of the division on and off campus.  
  14. Oversees and coordinates the Department Chair’s oversight of relationships between the division and external organizations (e.g., accrediting organizations, consortia programs, articulation agreements, and professional organizations).  
  15. Approves the content of divisional promotional materials.  
  16. Serves as a member of the Academic Policy Committee and the Enrollment Management Committee.  
  17. Serves as liaison with other divisions and support units.  
  18. Collaborates with student affairs on the administration of student organizations.  

Curriculum 

  1. Encourages and guides the development and improvement of the divisional curriculum in collaboration with departmental faculty on an ongoing basis.  
  2. Recommends divisional curricular proposals to the Curriculum Committee.  
  3. Coordinates program review and outcomes assessment for academic programs within the division.
  4. Provides leadership in the development and implementation of learning goals and measures of outcomes assessment for academic programs within the division.  
  5. Prepares the schedule of courses in collaboration with Department Chairs and Program Coordinators in relation to student need, budget and curriculum integrity.   
  6. Develops a two-year course cycle in collaboration with program directors to facilitate student planning and ensure timely graduation of students.  
  7. Reviews and approves student requests for course substitutions, transfer credit, internships, independent study, course exemptions, study abroad, and permission to take courses at other institutions.  
  8. Consults with the faculty and librarian regarding acquisition of books and media for various program areas within the division.  

Faculty and Staff 

  1. Encourages and recognizes faculty performance by fostering good teaching, scholarly writing and creative activity, professional development and service to the division and college.  
  2. Observes the work of faculty members within the division, especially of probationary faculty, and assists them in promoting the objectives of the College.  
  3. Evaluates tenure-track full-time faculty in consultation with Department Chairs and other appropriate faculty and makes recommendations to the VPAA/Dean for retention or dismissal (e.g., annual teaching observations; annual faculty review; Committee on Promotion and Tenure letter).  
  4. Recruits senior faculty to serve as mentors to tenure-track faculty members.  
  5. Makes recommendations to the VPAA/Dean on tenure, promotion, reappointment, faculty development grants, course releases, Sokol grants, leaves and fellowships, and administrative assignments.  
  6. Proposes the need for new faculty or staff members to the VPAA/Dean in September.  
  7. Oversees search committees for new full-time faculty and staff searches within the division.  
  8. Maintains a divisional file of office correspondence and evaluation documents for full-time faculty and staff.  
  9. Hires and orients part-time faculty in collaboration with full-time faculty and the VPAA/Dean.  
  10. Oversees orientation of part-time faculty in collaboration with Department Chair, and Program Coordinator, faculty and Associate Dean.  
  11. Guides a process of evaluation of part-time faculty.  
  12. Supervises divisional support staff including selection, scheduling and evaluation.  

Budget, Planning and Other 

  1. Manages division budgets with assistance from program directors and the  Associate Vice President for Academic Administration.  
  2. Makes operational and capital budget requests and recommends strategic initiatives for the coming year.  
  3. Provides oversight of facilities and equipment in the division.
  4. Participates in planning of short-term and long-term use of space.  
  5. Consults with the  Associate Vice President for Academic Administration and the Business Office on issues of insurance, space contracts, payroll, and off-campus activities.  
Selection of Division Chairs  

 Division Chairs serve as the primary representative of the academic programs within the division and report to the Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty. In consultation with the faculty, the VPAA/Dean recommends the appointment of the Division Chair to the President. In most cases, Division Chairs will be tenured and will be appointed for a period of three years. Chairs may be reappointed by the President with appropriate consultation from the VPAA/Dean and the faculty following the selection procedures outlined below. Newly appointed Division Chairs will normally begin on a part-time basis the first day of the Summer I term. The term for outgoing chairs will normally end the last day of the Summer II term. 

 

Selection Procedures 

  1. At the November divisional meeting prior to the start of a new term, tenure-track and tenured faculty members will be provided with a list of the duties and responsibilities of a Division Chair and the policy and procedures for the selection of a Division Chair will be reviewed.  
  2. At the December divisional meeting, faculty interested in serving as Division Chair will be identified and forwarded to the VPAA/Dean. 
  3. During the time period between the December and February divisional meetings, faculty members and the VPAA/Dean shall have an opportunity to meet individually with candidates for the position of Division Chair.  
  4. At the February divisional meeting, the VPAA/Dean will consult with tenure-track and tenured faculty members of the division with regard to the next Division Chair. Candidates for Division Chair will be excused from the meeting. At the meeting, the divisional faculty will make their recommendation to the Dean. 
  5. No later than March 1, the VPAA/Dean shall submit a recommendation for Division Chair to the President.  
  6. No later than March 15, the President shall appoint the Division Chair for a specified term.  
Duties and Responsibilities of Department Chair  
  1. Works closely with the Division Chair to implement the strategic plan for the division.  
  2. Prepares agendas for and presides over departmental meetings. Forwards the minutes of departmental meetings to the Division Chair.  
  3. Prepares schedule of courses for all sessions in relation to student needs and curriculum integrity and recommends them to the Division Chair.  
  4. Prepares, in consultation with the departmental faculty, recommendations for the revision of departmental objectives, academic programs and course descriptions for the catalog.  
  5. Works with the Division Chair in interviewing, orienting and mentoring adjunct faculty members for the department.  
  6. Encourages the development and improvement of the departmental curriculum in collaboration with faculty on an ongoing basis and its effect on student learning.  
  7. Works with the Division Chair in the supervision of full-time faculty searches within the department.  
  8. Oversees relationship between division and external organizations (e.g., accrediting organizations, consortia programs, articulation agreements, and professional organizations).  
  9. Recommends to the Division Chair the content of promotional departmental materials.  
  10. Assists and advises the Division Student Recruiter.  
  11. Attends selected events as departmental representative (e.g., open houses, receptions for honors students, receptions for accepted students).  
  12. Advises the Division Chair as to the budget, faculty, and facilities and equipment in the department. Participates in planning of short-term and long-term use of space.  
  13. Mediates student and faculty complaints as appropriate.  
  14. Reviews the course evaluations for adjunct faculty within the department. 
Selection of Department Chairs  

Department Chairs serve as the primary representative of the academic department and collaborate with the Division Chair.  In consultation with the faculty, the Division Chair recommends the appointment of the Department Chair to the VPAA/Dean, normally for a three-year term.  The Department Chair may be reappointed by the VPAA/Dean after appropriate consultation with the Division Chair and the department faculty.   

Duties and Responsibilities of Program Coordinator  
  1. Works closely with the Division Chair to implement the strategic plan for the division.  
  2. Prepares agendas for and presides over department/program meetings. Forwards the minutes of department/program meetings to the Division Chair.  
  3. Prepares schedule of courses for all sessions in relation to student needs and curriculum integrity and recommends them to the Division Chair.  
  4. Prepares, in consultation with the department/program, faculty recommendations for the revision of departmental objectives, academic programs and course descriptions for the catalogue.  
  5. Works with the Division Chair in interviewing, orienting and mentoring adjunct faculty members for the department/program.  
  6. Encourages the development and improvement of the department/program curriculum in collaboration with faculty on an ongoing basis and its effect on student learning.  
  7. Works with the Division Chair in the supervision of full-time faculty searches within the department/program.  
  8. Oversees relationship between division and external organizations (e.g., accrediting organizations, consortia programs, articulation agreements, and professional organizations).  
  9. Recommends to the Division Chair the content of promotional department/program materials.  
  10. Assists and advises the Division Student Recruiter.  
  11. Attends selected events as department/program representative (e.g., open houses, receptions for honors students, receptions for accepted students).  
  12. Advises the Division Chair as to the budget, faculty, and facilities and equipment in the department/program. Participates in planning of short-term and long-term use of space.  
  13. Mediates student and faculty complaints as appropriate.  
  14. Reviews the course evaluations for adjunct faculty within the department/program.  

 

 Selection of Program Coordinators  

  Program Coordinators serve as the primary representative of the academic program and collaborate with the Division Chair. In consultation with the faculty, the Division Chair recommends the appointment of the Program Coordinator to the VPAA/Dean, normally for a three-year term. The Program Coordinator may be reappointed by the VPAA/Dean after appropriate consultation with the Division Chair and the department faculty.  

Officers of the Faculty Council  

(See   Current Faculty Governance on the Faculty Portal for a complete description of the duties of each of the officers of the Faculty Council) 

Faculty Council Officer and Committee Terms of Service:

As part of shared governance, full-time faculty serve on committees and as officers of the Faculty Council. General elections for these positions take place at the April and May meetings of the Council, with replacement elections occurring throughout the year as needed. Officer and committee terms run from July 1st through June 30th. Committee chairs must submit their yearend report to the Secretary of the Faculty Council by June 15th. To ensure a clear transition of information and leadership, each committee must select its chair for the coming year and communicate that information to both the President and Secretary of the Faculty Council by July 1st. Although, customarily, the work of the committees does not occur outside of the contractual period, at times committees must convene or discuss urgent items of business over the summer months. If such instances arise, every effort will be made to limit the amount of work and communication required of faculty.  

Return to Table of Contents


Section III: Academic Structure

 

Business

  • Business, Division Chair, Vandana  Rao  
  • Accounting, Department Chair, Andrea Tsentides

 

Communication and Media Arts 

  • Communication and Media Arts, Division Chair, Peter Schaefer  
  • Communication and Media Arts, Department Chair, Jennifer Dixon  

 

Fine and Performing Arts 

  • Fine and Performing Arts, Division Chair, Katie Langan  
  • Art, Department Chair, Katie Langan  
  • Dance, Department Chair, Nancy Lushington
  • Theatre, Department Chair, Jill Stevenson

 

Humanities and Social Sciences 

  • Humanities  and Social Sciences, Division Chair, Jennifer Brown  
  • Writing, Literature, & Language, Department Chair, Magdalena Maczynska
  • History, Philosophy and Religious Studies, Department Chair, Lauren Brown
  • International Studies, Department Chair, Jennifer Mueller
  • Interdisciplinary Studies, Coordinator,  Jennifer Mueller
  • Politics and Human Rights, Department Chair,  Jessica Blatt  
  • Academic Writing  Program, Director, Diana Epelbaum  

 

Sciences 

  • Sciences, Division Chair, Ken Ching  
  • Communication Sciences and Disorders, Department Chair,  Susan Behrens  
  • Mathematics, Department Chair, Lia Margolin
  • Natural Sciences, Department Chair, Alessandra Leri
  • Psychology, Department  Chair, Sarah Weinberger-Litman

SECTION IV: CURRICULUM PLANNING            AND STUDENT  LEARNING ASSESSMENT  

 

Curriculum Planning  

Faculty members are encouraged to work with their departments, division and college in the planning, maintenance, revision and creation of academic curricula. It is through such dynamic, faculty-centered development that Marymount Manhattan College can continue to offer engaging courses that drive and represent our dedication to a  liberal education.  

To assist in the process of curriculum development there are several forms available to the faculty. Each form is applicable to a specific type of curricular development needed. All forms may be found in the Appendix of this handbook. Additional questions regarding curriculum development may be directed to the members of the Curriculum Committee.   

(See  Faculty Portal for all  Curriculum  Committee  Forms )    

 

Student Learning Assessment  

In addition to assigning grades for assessment of learning in individual courses, faculty engage in assessment of student learning at the program level. Doing so enables faculty to assess whether students are in fact achieving the learning goals of their respective majors/programs. Measuring student learning at the program level also enables faculty to determine what areas of the curriculum might be altered to improve student learning. Further, student learning assessment is required to maintain accreditation by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education which requires that student learning assessment be conducted at the program and institutional level. A variety of assessment measures including homework, papers, exams, presentations, projects, and performances measure the level of mastery of these goals for each student.   

At the program level, student-centered learning goals have been generated by the faculty to articulate what graduates of these programs should be able to do as a result of completing the program. Direct and indirect assessment methods are designed by the faculty in each department and implemented to measure the level of student achievement of the program goals. Typically, program assessment takes place within the capstone course; however, faculty may wish to conduct program assessment earlier, at various points of program completion.  

Assessment of student learning in the general education curriculum also occurs.  Each general education requirement (writing, mathematics, disciplinary studies, and interdisciplinary perspectives) has an assessment program that helps faculty understand the strengths and weaknesses of the curriculum and of pedagogy.  

Also at the institutional level,  periodically, a sample of first-year and senior-year students is asked to complete the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). The NSSE asks students to indicate the degree to which they are engaged in various kinds of classroom and extracurricular activities. Established research into student learning shows that student engagement in classroom and extracurricular activities increases the likelihood that students will persist and succeed in their higher education endeavors. The College uses these and other data to assess students’ academic success.  

There are various other assessments at the institutional level. Routinely, data on graduation rates and retention rates are collected and analyzed. When the data indicate a downward trend, then further research is conducted. For example, the exit survey completed by students who are leaving MMC without finishing a degree program has been redesigned to determine more specifically why students are not being retained.   

Ideally, faculty and students should be familiar with the learning goals for their majors/programs. The learning goals for the majors/programs are listed below:   

(See Faculty Portal for   Information for Student Syllabus. This is a Word document that will download automatically. ) 

 

Learning Goals (General Education)  

Disciplinary Studies  

Learning Goal  

Studies in Creative Expression  

  1. Students will engage as informed observers or active participants in the visual, spatial, performing or creative arts.   
  2. Students will describe processes by which works of art, media, performance and creative writing are created individually and collaboratively.   
  3. Students will demonstrate critical listening, reading, seeing and writing skills, and the ability to articulate aesthetic responses.   

Studies in Literature and Language  

  1. Students will articulate their understanding of the role language plays as a system of communication and as a marker of cultural expression and identity. 
  2. Students will produce formal analyses of how oral or written language reflects the sociohistorical conditions that produce it.  
  3. Students will apply a variety of theoretical frameworks to their analysis of written and oral language.  

Studies in Natural Science and Math  

  1. Students will demonstrate higher-level critical thinking and quantitative reasoning skills.  
  2. Students will integrate and apply principles of the natural sciences and mathematics.   
  3. Students will demonstrate comprehension and will communicate scientific or mathematical knowledge.   

Studies in Psychology, Philosophy and Religious Studies  

  1. Students will identify, describe, and explain key terms, concepts, and distinctions central to the discipline of psychology, philosophy, or religious studies.  
  2. Students will reconstruct and explain (in speaking and writing) various arguments concerning the foundations and applications of theories of human nature, knowledge, and/or value.  
  3.  Students will critically evaluate (in speaking and writing).

Studies in Social Science, Business and History  

  1. Students will critically consume discipline-specific knowledge in social science, business, or history.  
  2. Students will discriminate between a  variety of research methods, and demonstrate an understanding of their advantages and limitations.  
  3. Students will identify the economic, historical, political or social factors shaping the procedures, practices, and policies of collective existence.   

 

Perspective  

Learning Goals  

Cultural Perspectives  

  1. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the ways through which culture is produced.  
  2. Students will demonstrate knowledge of how people participate in and are influenced by individual, group, and   social action.   
  3. Students will recognize their contribution to the production, consumption, and reproduction of culture.   

Ethical Perspectives  

  1. Students will identify ethical issues and controversies in various contexts.   
  2. Students will analyze and articulate multiple perspectives on ethical issues.   
  3. Students will construct arguments that are grounded in ethical and other analytical or scholarly perspectives in support of their own judgments.  

International Perspectives  

  1. Students will demonstrate a comparative understanding of communities outside the United States.   
  2. Students will identify and evaluate contemporary or historical issues from global perspectives.  
  3. Students will demonstrate an awareness of international communities and perspectives to encourage engagement with the world and its citizens.

Natural Science Perspectives  

  1. Students will articulate and recognize the contribution of scientific developments to human endeavors.  
  2. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the scientific method as it applies to the natural and physical world.  
  3. Students will identify the relevant key aspects of the evolution of scientific thought.  
  4. Students will gain experience working with empirical data.  

U.S. Perspectives  

  1. Students will identify and analyze issues central to the United States experience.  
  2. Students will articulate and analyze the plurality of experiences in the United States.  
  3. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the impact of diversity on the United States experience.   

 

Learning Goals (Majors/Programs)  

Department  

Learning Goals  

Art   

 

Upon completing the major in art, students will be able to:   

  1.   Exhibit conceptual and technical skills in a chosen art or articulate aesthetic responses through critical observation, reading, design medium, writing and oral presentation.  
  2. Demonstrate scope and depth of knowledge in art history and develop an individual artistic and/or design vision necessary to aesthetic practices. advance studies and/or enter careers in the visual arts  

Biology   

 

After completing the major in biology, students will be able to:   

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of biology, chemistry, physics and mathematics  
  2. Demonstrate understanding of natural sciences from both a contemporary and historical perspective  
  3. Demonstrate enhanced critical thinking skills  
  4. Integrate and apply scientific information  
  5. Utilize research strategies to address scientific questions.   
  6. Effectively communicate scientific principles orally and in writing.   
  7. Actively participate in the scientific community.   
  8. Demonstrate appropriate training for the pursuit of post-baccalaureate careers, advanced degrees or professional programs.  

 

Business Management  

After completing the business management major, a student will be able to:  

B.S. 

Goal 1:  Business functions: Apply concepts in marketing, finance, management, economics and accounting in business methods and strategies.   

Goal 2: Critical Thinking: Interpret situations and apply appropriate methods to solve business problems.   

Goal 3: Technology: Demonstrate the appropriate use of technology to conduct research, manage information and communicate effectively.  

Goal 4: Diversity: Articulate the importance of diversity and demonstrate the value of different perspectives in decision-making.   

Goal 5: Communication skills: Demonstrate competency in writing and speaking professionally.  

Goal 6: Ethics: Integrate ethical principles with business processes.  

Goal: 7: Quantitative skills: Demonstrate skills in utilizing quantitative concepts, data and models to analyze business.   

 

B.A. 

Goal 1:  Business functions: Apply concepts in marketing, finance, management, economics and accounting in business methods and strategies.   

Goal 2: Critical Thinking: Interpret situations and apply appropriate methods to solve business problems.   

Goal 3: Technology: Demonstrate the appropriate use of technology to conduct research, manage information and communicate effectively.  

Goal 4: Diversity: Articulate the importance of diversity and demonstrate the value of different perspectives in decision-making.   

Goal 5: Communication skills: Demonstrate competency in writing and speaking professionally.  

Goal 6: Ethics: Integrate ethical principles with business processes.  

 

Communication Arts  

 

COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA ARTS DIVISION GOALS  

After completing the major, a student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of how communication affects individuals, society, and/or diverse public/professional groups.  
  2. Produce oral, written, or mediated communication that engages with culturally relevant and/or social justice issues.  

GOALS FOR INDIVIDUAL MAJORS  

Communication Arts  

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of how communication theory shapes individual, group, and/or organizational behavior.  
  2. Creatively analyze and criticize communication texts using appropriate vocabulary.  

PR and Strategic Communication  

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of how message design shapes the effectiveness of social practices at the interpersonal, group, organizational, and public levels.  
  2. Evaluate and employ communication theories to effectively respond to issues that require social action.  

Cinema, Television, and Emerging Media  

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of cinema, television, and/or emerging media aesthetics and forms.  
  2. Explain the relationship between media texts and industrial, technological, and/or social forces.  

Digital Journalism  

  1. Apply research, writing, and reporting skills through traditional as well as digital media to create informative, relevant, and original content.  
  2. Articulate the impact of new technologies on journalists in the 21st century.  

Digital Media and Video Production  

  1. Execute compelling projects using video, sound, and/or emerging media skills.  
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of cinema, television, and/or emerging media aesthetics and forms.  

Dance  

Upon completing the major in dance, students will be able to:   

BFA/BA 

  1. Demonstrate, in movement, writing, and speech, critical engagement with practices, theories and histories of dance.   
  2. Integrate creative, intellectual and physical approaches in the study of dance techniques, composition, production and performance, at a level commensurate to sustain and refine growth in the individual’s area of concentration.   
  3. Practice discipline, reflection, communication, and collaborative skills commensurate with professional and post-graduate environments.   
  4. Apply sophisticated kinesthetic and physical awareness to work in the discipline and to associated fields of artistic and knowledge production.   
  5. Respond critically to choreographies and performances using integrated descriptive, analytical, interpretative, and evaluative skills.   
  6. Employ creative and intelligent approaches, such as tolerance for ambiguity, negotiation, and the development of alternative courses of action, in addressing challenges of collective and individual processes.   
  7. Propose strategies and techniques for arts advocacy and for participation in the improvement of society through dance on a community, institutional and social level.  

Writing, Literature, and Language  

 

The major provides a platform on which students will:    

  1. Analyze a variety of texts from world literature in several genres.  
  2. Analyze texts from world literature using a variety of critical methods and approaches.  

In addition, those concentrating in Creative Writing will:  

  1. Practice the fundamentals of writing poetry, fiction and creative non-fiction.  
  2. Produce creative work that develops these foundational skills through advanced-level study of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.  
  3. Use these skills in analysis and revision of their own work.  
  4. Apply these skills in working with other students through the workshop model.  
  5. Create an undergraduate literary magazine from first receiving submissions to editing, layout and distribution.  
  6. Express their own tradecraft while examining the many contrasting views.  

In addition, those concentrating in Literature will:  

  1. Utilize a variety of research tools to situate their literary interpretations into a larger critical conversation.  
  2. Write and present orally critical analyses of literary texts that frame them within a broader historical and cultural context.  

In addition, those concentrating in Literature and Media will:  

  1. Utilize a variety of research tools to interpret various media (cinema, television, and/or emerging media) into a larger critical conversation.  
  2. Write and present orally critical analyses of media (cinema, television, and/or emerging media) that frame them within a broader historical and cultural context.  

History*  

 

Upon graduation, students will be able to:   

  1. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the past gained through reading, writing, discussion and lectures;   
  2. Students will demonstrate understanding of their society in context of diverse time frames and perspectives;
  3. Students will read and think critically, write and speak clearly and persuasively, and conduct research effectively;   
  4. Students will demonstrate insight into human values in their own and other cultural traditions.  

*Adapted from the AHA (American Historical Association) “Liberal Learning and the History Major”  

International Studies  

 

Upon completing the major in international studies, students will be able to:  

  1. Demonstrate a critical understanding of global politics, economics and history;  
  2. Demonstrate a cross-cultural understanding and be able to analyze and evaluate issues from a global perspective;  
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of international institutions and their role in the world;  
  4. Demonstrate an ability to write well and conduct research.  

Philosophy and Religious Studies   

 

Upon completing the major in Philosophy and Religious Studies, students will be able to:   

  1. Identify (in speaking and writing) concerns at the heart of human experience, especially those pertaining to the fundamental nature of reality, knowledge, and values;  
  2. Investigate, understand, and articulate (in speaking and writing) the way great thinkers and religious communities have addressed these issues throughout history;  
  3. Explain (in speaking and writing) the nature and function of religion in individual life and human society, and historical and contemporary differences and similarities between religious systems; and   
  4. Respond to and evaluate (in speaking and writing) these concerns themselves, building on a firm foundation of cultural literacy, analytic method, and critical intelligence.   

Political Science  

 

Upon completing the major in political science, students will be able to:   

  1. Critically reflect on and analyze contemporary political trends   
  2. Communicate effectively, both orally and in writing, about political topics, and developments  
  3. Conduct qualitative and quantitative research on political topics  

Psychology  

 

After completing the major, students will be able to:  

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of diverse areas in psychology;   
  2. Evaluate and perform research;   
  3. In both written and oral presentation, communicate psychological material clearly and in appropriate format and style;
  4. Apply psychological content and skills to professional or pre-professional tasks  

Sociology  

 

Students who graduate with a major in sociology should be able to do the following:  

  1. Evaluate quantitative and qualitative research articles in the field  
  2. Design and implement valid, reliable, and ethically sound research that is original and empirical  
  3. Analyze social situations utilizing different theoretical perspectives implicit in sociological imagination  

Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology  

 

Upon completion of the major, students will be able to:  

  1. Effectively demonstrate knowledge of a range of normal, different, and disordered functions of human communication system, across varied cultural contexts  
  2. Exhibit critical thinking and  problem-solving  skills in behavior, speech, and writing across genres  
  3. Demonstrate scientific literacy as it pertains to the communication system by engaging in tasks such as research, and clinical and field-related practica.   

Theatre Arts  

Upon completing the major, students will be able to:   

 BA /BFA 

  1. Demonstrate comprehension of achievements in drama and theatrical production across a range of periods and cultures.   
  2. Demonstrate comprehension of the interdisciplinarity of theatre study and the collaborative nature of theatre production.   
  3. Demonstrate writing, oral communication, research, performance, and technical skills as foundations for building specific expertise in selected areas of concentration.   
  4. Draw on external resources for further study and work experience by utilizing museums, theatres, performing arts organizations, libraries, and other institutions in New York City and abroad.   

 Academic Divisions: Course Differentiation Characteristics 

The faculty of the various academic divisions and departments have identified the   characteristics that differentiate 100-, 200-, 300-, and 400-level courses.  They are presented below by division and, in some instances, by department.  

Accounting and Business Management  

100-Level  

200-Level  

300-level  

400-Level  

* Intro to databases, APA format – a basic intro to research.  

* Develop writing and presenting (oral presentations also included when possible) skills.  * Provide grading rubrics for written and oral presentations. Use exemplars examples of good papers/ assignments) to clarify expectations.    

Integrate reading and analyzing business newspapers/journals.   

 

* Making connections as they compare/contrast theoretical models/ conceptual frameworks.    

* Build research, analytical and conceptual skills through appropriate writing/and or oral presentation based assignments.   Continue using exemplars and rubrics.    

* Discuss/analyze specific readings in addition to a text, including cases, scholarly articles, consumer journals and specialized business publications.   

* Students ‘create’ a product, propose a thesis statement, or write/present a research/ applied research paper that proposes a distinct point of view while synthesizing/evaluating theories/concepts and examining evidence across fields such as accounting, economics and business.    

* Complete a list of readings/ manuals/scholarly articles, theoretical works and engage in discussions/ writing assignments to integrate concepts/analysis across disciplines  

 

* Complete a major individual research/applied research capstone project that replicates practice and demonstrates depth and breadth in the field.   

*  Present (scholarly or theoretical works) readings/applied research in a setting that replicates the workplace; example presenting an executive summary report or preparing and presenting an audit.   

 

 

Communication and Media Arts  

100-Level  

200-Level  

300-level  

400-Level  

Students are introduced to foundational concepts within the discipline.  Upon successful completion of a 100-level course, students are able to recognize and articulate essential theories.  In addition to becoming acquainted with basic theoretical propositions, students also embark on basic skill building.  Level 100 courses also guide students in making logical and ethical critiques of basic communication arts concepts.  

 

Courses offer a more complex survey of concepts and skills.  Upon successful completion of a 200-level course, students are able to further utilize course material:  applying theories across an array of contexts and building skills informed in part by 100-level courses.   Intermediate critical thinking skills are fostered as students assess scenarios and develop arguments for the utility, functionality, and timeliness of communication arts concepts.  

Students build from 100 and 200-level courses to have a more secure identity as practitioners of communication arts.  Students become acquainted with primary sources and explore introductory research methods and methodology.  Upon successful completion of a 300-level course, students will be able to appraise concepts at an intermediate to advanced level and defend the practicality and marketability of their growing skill set.  Service learning opportunities introduced at the 300-level allow students’ creative and practical skills to develop.  

 

Students use the skills learned in lower-level courses to create and contribute to the field of communication arts.  Upon successful completion of a 400-level course, students further develop a sense of identity as communication arts practitioners, making initial yet significant contributions to their intended profession.     

 

Fine and Performing Arts  

100-Level  

200-Level  

300-level  

400-Level  

Provide an introduction to foundational skills and aesthetic literacy.  

 

 

Are typically for the majors/minors in the discipline or more advanced sophomore-level courses in general education.  Students develop foundational knowledge and aesthetic literacy through the study of concepts, history, and theory, and develop fundamental skills for the discipline.  

 

Are advanced studies in the discipline in which students build on foundational knowledge and skills from 200-level courses.  300-level courses typically encompass historical periods and broader techniques, or more focused themes, and incorporate advanced writing, presentation, and creative skills.  

Are advanced courses for majors and qualified minors wherein students demonstrate the scope and depth of their competency in their chosen field of study.  

 

 

Sciences 

100-Level 

200-Level 

300-level 

400-Level 

Communication Science Disorders  

The department differentiates our courses on the quality and quantity of our written assignments, the assigned texts, the extent of our use of primary literature and the types of clinically related activities in which students engage. 

Readings include textbooks, reports on language in the popular press, and structured reading of journal articles.   Writing requirements in one and two-hundred level courses include one-two page summary sheets of textbook chapters, three-page synthesis work of various data points, five-page papers synthesizing findings from texts and primary literature, annotated bibliographies, clinical observations reports, and literature reviews.  The use of primary literature in one and two-hundred level courses includes the current professional literature as well as foundational articles from the late 20 th century. The implementation of clinical activities in one and two-hundred level courses includes speech sampling, transcription and analysis, clinical observations, write-ups and presentations of in-class observations.  Students in our lower-level courses routinely present on material they have researched, including observations of clinical and audiological treatment. 

 

Readings include textbooks, reports on language in the popular press, and structured reading of journal articles.   Writing requirements in one and two-hundred-level courses include one-two page summary sheets of textbook chapters, three-page synthesis work of various data points, five-page papers synthesizing findings from texts and primary literature, annotated bibliographies, clinical observations reports, and literature reviews.  The use of primary literature in one and two-hundred level courses includes the current professional literature as well as foundational articles from the late 20 th century. The implementation of clinical activities in one and two-hundred level courses includes speech sampling, transcription and analysis, clinical observations, write-ups and presentations of in-class observations.  Students in our lower-level courses routinely present on material they have researched, including observations of clinical and audiological treatment.

Reading requirements in upper-level courses build on those in the lower level with a shift to more primary than textbook reading. The overall amount of assigned reading also increases.  Writing requirements in three -hundred level courses range from more detailed clinical observation reports to 20-page literature reviews. Students are required at this stage to go beyond summary and synthesis, to evaluation and hypothesis testing.  Advanced clinical writing includes session notes (SOAP notes), end of term progress reports, diagnostic reports, case studies, and the creation of a professional portfolio.  The use of primary literature in three -hundred level courses increases, and the overall demands of the associated assignments also increases (see above).   The implementation of clinical activities at the three -hundred level includes more detailed and advanced in-class observation, observation in the Ruth Smadbeck Center, and observation off-campus.   At the four-hundred level, students are responsible for providing services for patients/clients in the Smadbeck Center and at various internship sites 

Reading requirements in upper-level courses build on those in the lower level with a shift to more primary than textbook reading. The overall amount of assigned reading also increases.  Writing requirements in three -hundred level courses range from more detailed clinical observation reports to 20-page literature reviews. Students are required at this stage to go beyond summary and synthesis, to evaluation and hypothesis testing.  Advanced clinical writing includes session notes (SOAP notes), end of term progress reports, diagnostic reports, case studies, and the creation of a professional portfolio.  The use of primary literature in three -hundred level courses increases, and the overall demands of the associated assignments also increases (see above).   The implementation of clinical activities at the three -hundred level includes more detailed and advanced in-class observation, observation in the Ruth Smadbeck Center, and observation off-campus.   At the four-hundred level, students are responsible for providing services for patients/clients in the Smadbeck Center and at various internship sites 

Mathematics

These are elementary level math courses and students with adequate high school algebra skills may take these courses.  These courses serve as prerequisite courses for 200-level math courses and prepare students with the math skills they need for higher level math courses. 

 

These are more sophisticated math courses that assume students have good high school algebra skills or have satisfied a prerequisite course that may be 100-level or part of a sequence such as Calculus I & II.  These courses expose students to formal math definitions, concepts and theorems, and applications of these concepts and theorems.  In some courses, students learn how to write simple math proofs. 

These courses have a higher level of abstraction and expose students to various branches of mathematics.  Students read and write math proofs, and learn how to communicate mathematics effectively both in oral and written form.  These courses provide students with the foundational mathematics that they need to pursue a career in mathematics or the mathematical sciences. 

 

These courses are for students with a high level of mathematical maturity – ability to read and write mathematical proofs and knowledge of fundamental concepts in linear algebra, abstract algebra, and analysis.  These courses offer students the opportunity to pursue a study in a specialized area or topic. 

(Note:  We have only three courses at this level: Math 497 Research, Math 498 Directed Study, and Math 499 Independent Study/Internship.) 

Natural Sciences 

*demonstrate a basic knowledge of the fundamental principles of the natural sciences 

*demonstrate math skills taught in intermediate algebra, including familiarity with the metric system, basic graphing and data analysis, ratios and proportions 

*demonstrate critical thinking in reading and summarizing basic scientific articles written for the general public 

 

*be proficient in intermediate algebra skills 

*develop basic writing and library research skills  

*read and interpret scientific data in a variety of forms 

*apply the scientific method  

*exhibit problem solving and discipline-specific elementary lab skills 

*explain and apply the fundamentals of natural science 

*demonstrate a basic knowledge of and application of precalculus 

*read and critically evaluate primary scientific literature 

*communicate scientific principles   

*demonstrate advanced laboratory skills 

*analyze and evaluate case histories to generate hypotheses to make broader scale predictions  

 

*ask scientific questions and prepare experimental strategies to answer those questions 

*utilize research strategies to address scientific principles 

*effectively present scientific concepts and research using both written and oral formats suitable for the scientific community 

*generate advanced research projects   

*conduct library based research projects and present conclusions to a professional audience 

Psychology 

Courses at the 100 level provide a broad introduction to research and theory in psychology; materials are largely text-book based; students are required to: 

*Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the fundamental principles of the science of psychology including a basic understanding of the research process and study design 

*Develop a knowledge base in selected areas of psychology including but not limited to, functions of the brain, consciousness, perception, memory, human development, personality, social psychology, motivation, intelligence and psychological disorders. 

*Demonstrate critical thinking in reading and summarizing relevant material available to the layperson 

Courses at the 200 level provide a broad introduction to research and theory in one or more area of psychology; materials are largely text-book based and include some original sources from professional peer-reviewed journals; students are required to:   

*Explain and apply the fundamentals of a specialized area of psychology 

*Demonstrate basic writing and library research skills  

*Increase their ability to read and interpret scientific data 

 

 

Courses at the 300 level explore an area of psychology in depth, applying the principles and theories of the discipline; materials may be drawn from original sources and/or from a specialized text; students are required to: 

*Independently locate relevant primary scientific literature and critically evaluate primary scientific literature 

*Apply and communicate scientific principles through presentations, papers and projects 

*Analyze existing research to generate hypotheses 

Courses at the 400 level serve as capstones to the major; materials are based on primary sources; students are required to:  

*Develop scientific hypotheses based on an evaluation of research and theoretical principles in psychology  

*Develop research methodologies to address scientific hypotheses 

*Effectively present scientific concepts and research using both written and oral formats 

*Conduct a broad survey of library-based research; integrate and evaluate the results. 

Return to Table of Contents


SECTION  V.  ACADEMIC POLICIES  

 

Policies Specific to Faculty  

Annual Review of Tenure-Track Faculty with the VPAA/Dean  

Please see Appendix E:  College By-Laws Document. 

 

Statement on Academic Freedom  

Marymount Manhattan College fully endorses the “Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure” published by the American Association of University Professors in 1940 and re-interpreted in 1970. This statement reads, in part:  

Institutions of higher learning are conducted for the common good and not to further the interest of either the individual teacher or the institution as a whole. The common good depends upon the free search for truth and its free exposition.  

Academic freedom is essential to these purposes and applies to both teaching and research. Freedom in research is fundamental to the advancement of truth. Academic freedom in its teaching aspect is fundamental for the protection of the rights of the teacher in teaching and of the student to freedom in learning. It carries with it duties correlative with rights….  

(a) Teachers are entitled to full freedom in research and in the publication of the results, subject to the adequate performance of their other academic duties; but research for pecuniary return should be based upon an understanding with the authorities of the institution.  

(b) Teachers are entitled to freedom in the classroom in discussing their subject, but they should be careful not to introduce into their teaching controversial matter which has no relation to the subject….  

(c) College and university teachers are citizens, members of a learned profession and officers of an educational institution. When they speak or write as citizens, they should be free from institutional censorship or discipline, but their special position in the community imposes special obligations. As scholars and educational officers, they should remember that the public may judge their profession and their institution by their utterances. Hence, they should at all times be accurate, should exercise appropriate restraint, should show respect for the opinions of others, and should make every effort to indicate that they are not speaking for the institution.  

 

Attendance at Faculty Council Meetings, Baccalaureate and Commencement  

(Included in annual faculty contracts)  

Faculty are expected to attend Faculty Council Meetings and participate in Baccalaureate and Commencement, generally held off-campus in May. Academic regalia is provided for faculty who request it by the published deadline.  

 

Courtesy Appointment Policies and Procedures  

(Approved by APC, July 2016)  

 

Policies Related to Courtesy Appointments 

A courtesy appointment is defined as the unpaid appointment of a person from outside the College or from a nonacademic unit within the College. Most courtesy appointees hold terminal degrees, but persons may be considered for nomination based upon their exceptional experience or special scholarly achievements. Courtesy appointments are made for a maximum of five years and can be renewed for additional terms of up to five years by the mutual agreement of all parties. Allow at least three months for the renewal process. A courtesy appointment may be rescinded by request of the host department detailing cause and with the approval of the VPAA/Dean. All courtesy appointments will end on June 30th of the year that the appointment expires or five (5) years from the day that the VPAA/Dean approves the appointment, whichever comes first without exceeding the five (5) year maximum. Academic duties, responsibilities, and privileges will be agreed to by the host department and the courtesy appointee. In formal settings, such as publications and grants, the appointee will use the “courtesy” term in the designation of his or her title, i.e., “Courtesy Clinical Research Associate” or “the author holds a courtesy appointment as a Clinical Research Associate at Marymount Manhattan College.”  

 

Duties and Responsibilities of Courtesy Appointees 

Courtesy appointees may contribute to the host department in a variety of ways, including but not restricted to: guest lectures, advising, mentoring, curriculum development, community partnership development, research, and grant writing. Courtesy appointees may be granted access to host department resources and attend departmental events (including departmental meetings) at the discretion of the host department.  Courtesy appointees are eligible for an MMC Identification Card, which qualifies them to receive library, email, and other College services provided to holders of MMC ID Cards.  

 

Requesting a Courtesy Appointment 

  1. The chair of the host department (the program receiving the services of the appointee) prepares an appointment application file, which includes the following:  
  2. Courtesy Appointment Approval Form  
  3. Letter of appointment from the chair of the host department, which includes the following:  
  4. The designation in the proposed host department  
  5. An overview of the appointee’s expected contributions to the proposed host department  
  6. An overview of the appointee’s rights and responsibilities in the host department  
  7. The length of the appointment  
  8. Curriculum vitae or resume  
  9. The courtesy appointment application file is forwarded by the chair of the host department to the appropriate Division Chair for review and approval.  
  10. Upon approval, the appointment application file is submitted to Academic Affairs.  
  11. Once received by Academic Affairs, the VPAA/Dean will review the appointment. If the appointment involves ongoing work directly with students, the VPAA/Dean will typically refer the candidate to Human Resources for a background check.  
  12. If the VPAA/Dean approves the appointment, the following distributions will occur:   An electronic copy of the appointment application file is sent to the chair of the host department; t he original file is sent to the requestor/supervisor; and t he chair of the host unit will notify the appointment holder.  

 

Reappointment of a Courtesy Appointee 

Courtesy reappointment requests should be made at least three months prior to the expiration of the appointee’s term.  If the host department wishes to reappoint the courtesy appointee, the chair of the host department should submit a Courtesy Appointment Approval Form, using the approval process outlined above.  

 

Financial Conflicts of Interest Policy for Faculty and Staff  

(Approved by APC, April 18, 2012)  

Federal regulations require that institutions applying for federal grant funds have a Conflicts of Interest policy that meets certain requirements.  These regulations seek: “to promote objectivity in research by establishing standards to ensure there is no reasonable expectation that the design, conduct or reporting of research funded under PHS grants or cooperative agreements will be biased by any conflicting financial interest of an investigator.” In conformance with these regulations, Marymount Manhattan College has established this policy.  

Faculty and staff have an obligation to conduct their college responsibilities within guidelines that prohibit actual or potential conflicts of interest and that maintain the highest standards of integrity.     

Accordingly, no faculty or staff shall have any interest, financial or otherwise, direct or indirect, or engage in any business or transaction or professional activity, or incur any obligation of any nature, which is in substantial conflict with the proper discharge of his or her duties and responsibilities at the College or from which s/he could benefit financially.   

In order to comply fully with the federal regulations, MMC is required to offer training, which is mandatory for faculty and staff involved in or applying for federally-funded research grants.  This training must occur prior to beginning work on any federally-funded research and must be repeated at least every four years.   

Integrity in research requires that all aspects of research be free from bias originating from any real or potential conflict of interest.  Conflicts of interest are not, in and of themselves, unallowable; however, they must be disclosed and managed in conformance with college policy and federal regulations.     

In order to limit any financial conflicts that may affect research and/or result in bias, and in compliance with federal regulations, Marymount Manhattan College requires disclosure of significant financial interests.  Faculty who wish to apply for research or educational funding to any federal granting agency, or any faculty participating in federally funded projects, must submit a financial disclosure listing any and all significant financial interests (SFI) of her/himself, his/her spouse or dependent children if:  

 

  • The value of said financial interest is $5,000 or more;  
  • The financial interest represents  any  equity, regardless of the value, in a non-public entity;  
  • It could reasonably appear that the financial interest might affect the activity for which funding is being sought; or   
  • If the research or educational activity might appear to affect the financial interests.  

 

The disclosure must cover the previous 12 months and it must be filed prior to the submission of any federal grant application.   If there is a change or if any new significant financial interest is acquired, the disclosure must be updated within 30 days.  If a multi-year federal grant is involved, the faculty member/Principal Investigator must disclose any significant financial interest at the time of the annual report to the granting agency.  

If the grant applicant or faculty participating in the grant project has no significant financial interests to disclose, s/he must so certify.  

An MMC faculty member might have, or appear to have, a conflict of interest if s/he is engaged in any of the following situations:  

  • Failing to disclose a significant financial interest, either his/her own or that of a spouse or dependent children, which could affect the performance of official duties, including teaching and scholarship, or which could affect one’s judgment in the conduct of official duties, including research and scholarship.  
  • Engaging in outside employment that may affect or impair her/his judgment in the conduct of research or other official duties.  
  • Disclosing confidential information obtained in the course of official duties, except as required by law.  
  • Conducting college business with any entity in which the faculty member or a relative has a financial interest.    
  • Accepting gifts intended to, or giving the appearance of attempting to, influence the conduct of your official duties.  
  • Using or attempting to use his/her official status at MMC for personal gain or privilege.
  • Hiring or engaging in decisions about hiring, promoting, disciplining, discharging or supervising any employee who is a member of his/her family or a close personal friend.    

 

Some things to consider:    

  • Financial conflicts of interest may occur when an individual is in a position to influence college business dealings so as to produce personal gain for that individual, or for a relative, friend, or business associate.     
  • The increasing involvement of academic researchers and educators with industry and private entrepreneurial ventures can lead to an increased risk of conflict of interests.    
  • A financial conflict could exist if a faculty member receives a research grant that requires purchasing an expensive piece of equipment and then attempts to buy that equipment from a relative’s business.     

 

The VPAA/Dean has appointed the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, as the Conflicts of Interest Officer.   In this capacity, the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs is responsible for: 

  • Informing faculty and staff about the provisions of this policy, including the need to disclose significant financial interests prior to any federal grant submission.  
  • Receiving any submitted financial disclosures and reviewing them for possible conflicts.  
  • Consulting with the VPAA/Dean and any other appropriate officials to determine if there is a financial conflict of interest;  
  • Deciding what conditions, if any, are required to resolve any conflicts.    
  • Overseeing compliance with College policy in regard to FCOIs.  
  • Maintaining the confidentiality of any information disclosed, except as needed to resolve conflicts, or as required by any legitimate regulation or by law.  

In some cases, projects with financial conflicts can be carried out with conditions or restrictions determined by the Conflicts of Interest Officer.  Such conditions could include:  

  • Full and public disclosure of the financial interests.  
  • Divestiture of the financial interests;  
  • Modification or monitoring of the research;  
  • Recusal of the investigator from certain sections of the research;  
  • Severance of relations that cause or appear to cause conflicts of interest.  
  • Other conditions deemed by the Conflicts of Interest Officer to be appropriate.  

 

Faculty or staff found to be in violation of this policy may be subject to sanctions such:  

  • Having a letter of censure placed in the file;   
  • Being deemed ineligible to submit grant or IRB applications;   
  • Being prohibited from teaching or research;   
  • In egregious cases, not being reappointed or being dismissed.   

As required by federal regulations, the College will report to the NIH and/or to the appropriate federal authorities, granting agency, or other relevant entity about any conflicts of interest and how they are being managed at the College.   

 

Policy on Course Releases Related to Grants  

(Approved by APC on 7/2/14)  

A faculty member wishing to charge course releases to a grant may “buy-off” no more than 2 courses in a four-course semester and no more than 1 course in a three-course semester, with exceptions possible with the agreement of the Department Chair, the Division Chair and the VPAA/Dean.  

Policy on Faculty Files  

(Approved by Faculty Council)  

There shall be two sets of official faculty files consisting of an Academic Faculty File housed in the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs, and a Personnel File housed in the Office of Human Resources. The content and use of each file is set forth below:  

Academic Faculty File 

This shall be the only file used for the purposes of evaluation, promotion, tenure, and reappointment of full-time faculty members. The contents of this file shall include:  

  • Academic documentation (college transcripts, evidence of professional training, record of past employment, etc.).  
  • An updated curriculum vitae; it will be the faculty member’s responsibility to update the C.V. when warranted.  
  • Materials relating to the faculty member’s academic and professional accomplishments submitted by the faculty member or placed in the file at his/her request.  
  • Evaluations of professional performance at the College (Peer, Chair, and Dean’s teaching evaluations, student evaluations, letters of evaluation, etc.).  
  • Material concerning appointment, reappointment, promotion, tenure, completion of probationary period, and special terms or conditions of employment.  
  • Letters of Agreement or memos concerning changes in semester course load, release time, recruitment responsibilities, etc.  
  • All documents pertinent to resignation, college disciplinary actions, or severance.  
  • Documentation regarding the faculty member’s grants, awards, leaves, etc.  
  • Faculty self-assessments.  
  • Any statement the faculty member wishes to insert in response to or in elaboration of any other item in the file.  

Exclusions 

Medical records are not part of the Academic File. Any medical inquiries or information should be maintained in a separate and confidential medical file. However, a faculty member may choose to place material concerning medical/disability matters in his/her Academic File if the faculty member believes it is pertinent to his/her employment.  

The Tenure/Promotion Application (or Third-Year Review) File

The Candidate shall add supporting materials (e.g., articles, costumes, paintings, videos, books, etc.) that will temporarily be housed in the Office of Academic Affairs during the third-year review and tenure/promotion evaluation process. Such materials will be returned to the Candidate upon completion of the entire review/evaluation process. Note: All forms submitted by the Candidate for either process shall be added to the permanent Academic Faculty File.

The Confidential File

All confidential letters of evaluation from external evaluators received by the VPAA/Dean shall be placed in this file and housed in the Office of Academic Affairs. Redacted versions of these evaluations are made available to Candidate. 

File Maintenance  

Documents which are placed in an Academic File will be dated and signed by the VPAA/Dean or his/her designee at the time of their insertion in the file. Anonymous statements will not be placed in the file. If a specific document does not originate from the faculty member, or does not include by its definition a copy for the faculty member, the VPAA/Dean will send a copy of the document to the faculty member at the time of its insertion in the file, and request written confirmation of the faculty member’s acknowledgement of the document’s inclusion.  

Access to the Academic File  

The Academic File shall be maintained by the VPAA/Dean who will be responsible for preserving the confidentiality and proper use of the File. Access to the Academic File without approval of the faculty member shall be limited to the President, VPAA/Dean and the Divisional Chair. Application for tenure or for promotion shall be deemed to imply that the Committee on Promotion and Tenure has been given access to the applicant’s Academic File for the purpose of reviewing the faculty’s application. Other individuals and committees responsible for the review and recommendations of faculty members with respect to reappointment, promotion, tenure, grants, and other matters of faculty status, shall be granted access to the Academic File with permission of the faculty member. A custodial log shall record all instances of access to an Academic File and shall be part of the file.  

The faculty member has the right and responsibility to inspect all materials in his/her Academic File, exclusive of pre-employment materials. Confidential letters of recommendation solicited with respect to initial employment or other confidential letters of recommendation related to scholarly, artistic, and/or service pursuits subsequently solicited with the consent of the faculty member will be excluded from inspection.

A faculty member can request an appointment for the purpose of inspecting his/her Academic File. Such an appointment shall be scheduled during regular business hours. The manner of inspection shall be subject to reasonable conditions. The Academic Affairs Office will provide the faculty member with a copy of all requested materials.  

A faculty member has the right to submit material to be included in his or her file and to respond in writing to any document therein and have his/her written response placed in the file.  

Documents may be removed from a faculty member’s Academic File with the mutual consent of the faculty member and the VPAA/Dean.  

If, after the examination of the Academic File, a faculty member believes that any portion of the file is not accurate, he/she may request in writing a correction of the material and/or a deletion of a portion of the material. This request shall be addressed to the VPAA/Dean and describe the corrections/deletions the faculty member believes should be made, and the facts supporting the request. This request shall become part of the Academic File, except in those cases where the questioned material has been removed from the file.  

An Academic File may be opened to an outside agency only pursuant to subpoena or other legal process. When a File is requested by an outside agency for any reason, the affected faculty member shall be promptly notified and provided with a copy of the request and reason thereof.  

Personnel File 

The Personnel File shall include:  

  • Record of salary   
  • Change of employment status  
  • Record of leaves of absence   
  • Medical reports which are necessary to document benefits and medical leaves   
  • Records of benefits   
  • Record of accrued service   
  • General fiscal data  

Personnel Files are maintained by the Director of Human Resources who will be responsible for preserving the confidentiality and proper use of the File. The Personnel File may be used only by the Director of Human Resources, the VP for Finance and Administration, and the President for the purpose of administering salary and benefits.  

The faculty member shall have access to his/her file. Other MMC employees who wish to see a Personnel File must obtain permission from the faculty member involved.  

 

Observation Guidelines for Tenure-Track Faculty  

(Approved by APC, 12/2007)  

At Marymount Manhattan College teaching excellence is paramount in determining the continued service of tenure-track faculty members, and the College is committed to the ongoing pedagogical growth and development of its faculty. To assist tenure-track faculty members in this process, they are expected to participate in the College’s process of peer observation. Tenure-track faculty members are observed annually by their division chairs and must seek at least one additional observation by a full-time faculty member during each academic year prior to their applying for tenure. Senior faculty members are expected to play an integral role in guiding the pedagogical development of tenure-track faculty members by conducting these peer observations and completing written evaluations. Tenure-track faculty should also seek observations by their program or department coordinators or chairs, as applicable to individual situations. Additionally, an annual teaching observation is conducted by the Academic Affairs Office.  

Tenure-track faculty should discuss with their divisional chairs a schedule of observation for the upcoming year at the time of his/her annual review. The chair can offer advice about which faculty members to ask during a particular year and consider such issues as a faculty member’s expertise, or the potential benefit of an observation from a peer outside one’s division. It is the tenure-track faculty member’s responsibility to contact his/her potential faculty peer observers and to notify the divisional chair when that faculty member has agreed to be the designated peer observer for that year. The tenure-track faculty member can invite other faculty to observe his/her classes that year but, in the case of multiple observations, there must be an understanding between faculty and chair in advance about which will be the designated faculty observer.   

Faculty peer observers will attend a class session that is mutually convenient for both parties. It is advisable for the tenure-track faculty member to provide the observer with a copy of the course syllabus and any other relevant material for the class session in advance. The observer should be on time for the class session and attend the whole session or, in the case of double-session classes, be clear about the time frame that will be observed. Observers should customarily not participate in the class session and should save any comments for the post-observation conference.  

Observers may use the MMC Faculty Classroom Observation Form or a narrative format to document their evaluations. Observers should comment on the faculty member’s facility with course content, methodology, organization, student dynamics, and overall effectiveness of the session. Observers may choose to either write their evaluations before or after their meetings with faculty. At this meeting, the session is discussed as well as how the methodology and course serve programmatic goals. The process of writing the evaluation and holding a post-observation meeting should be timely and should not normally exceed a month from the observation date. The observer provides the faculty with two copies (signed by the observer) of the evaluation. The faculty member returns one copy which he/she also signs to the observer. A faculty member has the option of attaching a written response to the evaluation which will become a permanent part of the evaluation. The completed evaluation is submitted to the Academic Affairs Office by the observer to be placed in the faculty member’s faculty file.   

This process may also be utilized by tenured faculty members who wish to have their teaching formally observed by full-time faculty colleagues of their choice.   

 

Policy on Responsible Conduct of Research  

(Approved by APC on April 3, 2013)    

Link to IRB Page:   https://www.m mm.edu/offices/academic-affairs/institutional-review-board.php  

 

Marymount Manhattan College takes seriously its responsibilities with regards to responsible conduct of research.  As a small institution just beginning its quest for federal research support, we recognize the importance of establishing guidelines for ethical faculty research and a training process for students involved in funded research.  In conformance with federal regulations, we have established the guidelines outlined below.  

All faculty will receive our Guidelines for Responsible Conduct of Research.  This document offers ethical guidelines concerning research practices and includes a list of resources on this topic.    

Given our small size and lack of significant federal research support, we feel the best way to proceed for training of students involved in funded research is to use the existing training modules that are available online and free of charge.   We find such training to be informative and comprehensive and passing the course demonstrates a good understanding of Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR).     

Undergraduate students involved in funded research (we have neither graduate students nor any postdoctoral fellows) are required to complete an online training module on RCR and to submit their completion certificate to the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs prior to beginning their research.  Several training modules are available; here are the link and instructions for one such site:    

National Center for Principled Leadership & Research Ethics

This site offers a series of tutorials on the “Responsible Conduct of Research”   available at no cost to groups affiliated with educational or other non-profit institutions.  Upon entering this site, click on RCR Modules from CMDITR on the upper right, and work through the drop-down menu.  You must register as an individual user and your mentor must also register a research group and indicate which modules are required.  Once registration is complete, one can work one’s way through the training modules.  When finished, completion of the modules must be documented.  For this particular program, a check appears on the Table of Contents Page for each completed module; this page can then be printed to show completion of the required modules.  Other available training modules may offer a Certificate of Completion at the end and if so, this certificate should be printed for submission to the Office of Academic Affairs.   

Faculty mentors are responsible both for informing their students of this requirement and for telling the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs the names and contact information for all students they wish to engage in their funded research and/or whose funded research they supervise.  The Vice President’s office will then follow up with those students to make sure they understand their responsibilities in regard to RCR training and that they submit documentation of their training completion in a timely fashion.  

The VPAA/Dean, Dr. Peter Naccarato, will serve as Research Integrity Officer.  He is well qualified to fulfill this responsibility based on his extensive record of research and the respect with which the faculty view him. The VPAA/Dean also has assigned Mr. Richard Sheldon, Associate Vice President for Academic Administration, to conduct outreach to faculty and students about their responsibilities in this area and to monitor the submission of training certifications.   

Statement on Professional Ethics  

( Reproduced from the AAUP Statement on Professional Ethics at  https://www.aaup.org/report/statement-professional-ethics )  

“Professors, guided by a deep conviction of the worth and dignity of the advancement of knowledge, recognize the special responsibilities placed upon them. Their primary responsibility to their subject is to seek and state the truth as they see it. To this end, professors devote their energies to developing and improving their scholarly competence. They accept the obligation to exercise critical self-discipline and judgment in using, extending, and transmitting knowledge. They practice intellectual honesty. Although professors may follow subsidiary interests, these interests must never seriously hamper or compromise their freedom of inquiry.”   

Research with Human Subjects  

Institutional Review Board, 2014   

Human subjects (also called human participants) research is any activity intended to obtain and record information from or about individuals for research purposes. Examples of human subjects’ research include: surveys, observations of behavior, experiments involving human responses, and collection of data from existing records.  In  Spring  2007, Marymount Manhattan formed a Human Subjects Review Committee (later termed the Committee for the Review of Research with Human Participants).  In January 2014, the Academic Affairs Office applied for a Federal Wide Assurance (FWA) and registered its Institutional Review Board (IRB) with the federal government.    

If you are conducting or supervising research with human subjects, and if you are employed by Marymount Manhattan College (MMC) or you wish to do research on the premises of MMC, then your study should be reviewed by the MMC IRB.  The primary aim of this review process is to protect the basic rights of research participants, namely their right to be protected from harm and to be protected from invasion of privacy. The procedures for review and approval are regularly revised by the IRB to ensure their concurrence with relevant professional codes of ethics and with federal regulation Title 45, Part 46, effective July 14, 2009.   

In order to initiate the review process, you need to complete the appropriate application (faculty/staff application for review, student application for review, application for exempt from review status).  The application will require that you supply the IRB with information on your procedure, its risks and benefits, and, if applicable, such safeguards as participants’ informed consent and anonymity, and confidentiality of data.  The IRB meets monthly during the school year and less frequently during the summer months.  After your application has been approved, you must notify the IRB if you change research procedures or if you plan to continue your research more than one year past the initial approval date.  The IRB works with researchers to facilitate research. If an initial proposal is rejected, the Committee provides written feedback. If a revised proposal is submitted, the Committee re-evaluates that proposal.   

(Download the following Word document: Institutional Review Board  Frequently Asked Questions)  

 

Syllabi Distribution Policy  

(Approved by APC 12/2006)  

One of the customary responsibilities of faculty members is to prepare a well-designed syllabus that includes information about specific course learning objectives, course description, attendance policies, academic honesty, required texts, grading policies, and other pertinent material that the professor believes students need to know in order to complete the course successfully Syllabi are to be submitted to appropriate administrative offices and may also be made available to accrediting agencies and government bodies such as the State Department of Education. However, as an example of “intellectual work product,” the design and content of course syllabi remain the property of the individual faculty member who designed the course. Therefore, in light of the increasing tendency to post and share course materials in electronic forms, care should be taken to protect faculty work against unauthorized and inappropriate dissemination. It is the faculty member’s prerogative as to whether or not to post course materials online or distribute them in other forms.   

The following practices should be observed by all administrative offices whenever requests are made to College representatives by outside agencies or individuals (other than those such as state education departments that require such materials) for materials pertaining to courses that have been offered at the College:  

  1. The faculty member whose course information has been requested will be notified of the source and nature of the request as well as the actions taken in response to the request via copies of the email or letter exchanges.  
  2. In cases of requests from other colleges, universities or state education authorities regarding course descriptions, only those portions of the syllabi that identify course objectives or course descriptions will be provided. Usually, catalog descriptive materials should suffice.  
  3. The College will not provide course outlines, course assignments or material that might reasonably be construed as of an educational or instructional nature.  
  4. This policy will in no way restrict an individual faculty member from posting or distributing her or his course materials in any venue she or he sees fit.  

 

Teaching Excellence Award  

The Teaching Excellence Award Committee is composed of three faculty members: the past two recipients of the Teaching Excellence Award and one member elected by the Faculty Council for a one-year term. Committee members will be asked to stand-down from committee service in the event that they accept a nomination for the Award in this decision cycle. The committee member elected by the Faculty Council serves as chair. The function of the Teaching Excellence Award Committee is: To follow the process for selecting the Teaching Excellence Award recipient according to the process and criteria outlined in the Faculty Handbook.   

The Teaching Excellence Award Committee should meet at the beginning of the Fall semester to determine a timeline for their work. E-mail notice of the timeline and requirements for the award, along with a list of eligible candidates (this can be obtained from the Assistant to the VPAA/Dean), should be sent to all faculty early in the semester. Generally, the deadline should be a minimum of 2-3 weeks prior to the final Fall faculty meeting in order to give the members of the committee time to read all submissions and make a decision. The award is to be presented at the December session of the Faculty Council.  

The Teaching Excellence Award committee uses the definition of excellence outlined in the MMC Faculty By-Laws when making its selection. This definition is as follows:  

Excellent teaching stimulates intellectual curiosity and encourages independent and informed learning. Such teaching draws from a thorough knowledge of a field to present effectively that field’s concepts and content.  

 To be eligible for the Teaching Excellence Award, a faculty member:  

  • Must have completed four years of full-time (tenure-track) teaching at MMC at the time of nomination;  
  • Must not have received this award within the immediately preceding seven years.  

 

 Junior Faculty Forum

The Faculty Development Committee will host the Junior Faculty Forum once a year. The purpose of this forum is for Junior Faculty to meet in an informal off-campus setting to discuss issues of concern with the Faculty Council VP. The topics discussed at the forum range from preparing a tenure application to common issues encountered in the classroom.

 

  1. Policies Specific to Students  

Academic Honesty Policy  

(Written by Academic Honesty Committee, approved by Faculty Council 9/2005 and is published in the Student Handbook, the college website, and the FT and PT Faculty Handbooks)  

MMC fosters an academic community; students and faculty work together to create a learning experience that imparts knowledge and forms character, the hallmarks of a university culture. To achieve this, the College adheres to a policy of Academic Honesty, one that teaches students to complete tasks in a thoughtful, honest manner so as to breed a positive ideal of self-knowledge within each student. It is through this quality that a student understands her/his true capabilities.

This policy instructs students to honor their colleagues by producing work that is based on their own capabilities so fellow students receive their equal consideration in the eyes of their professor. Honest work – on the computer or in writing — is important in the development of the academic character. MMC desires for each student to finish each course, each program, with a developed sense of self, a pride in the integrity of his/her own work toward his/her own level of achievement; this will create a true community of dedicated, life-long learners.   

(See  MMC website  for the complete description of  the Academic Honesty  policy, process and relevant form )  

 

Academic Standards and Policies  

( MMC College Catalogue)  

 

Academic Standards 

College and universities in the United States establish and consistently apply standards of “good academic standing” to evaluate the progress of all students matriculated for degrees. Colleges and universities define and apply measures of good academic standing in two categories leading to degree completion; academic progress and academic pace.   

Academic Progress 

Academic progress is a qualitative measure; matriculated students must attain and maintain a minimum GPA of 2.0 for each semester, as well as cumulatively.  

Academic Pace 

Academic pace is a quantitative measure; each academic year matriculated students must  complete  a specified number of credits.  

Probation 

Students are placed on academic probation when they do not meet requirements for good standing for either progress or pace. Students on probation for progress:  

  • May not enroll for an independent study, internship or research project.  
  • Will not receive approval for Maintenance of Matriculation.  
  • May not enroll for more than 12 credits in a fall or spring semester.  
  • Must meet with an advisor in the Office of Academic Advisement three times per semester; students who fail to do so will be dismissed.   

Academic Suspension 

Academic suspension is recommended when, after two consecutive semesters in the college, a student has earned a cumulative GPA of 1.0 or less, and when even if mathematically possible, it would be highly unlikely, for the student to achieve a 2.0 cumulative GPA over the next semester.  Students placed on academic suspension may not enroll in the College for a period of at least two consecutive semesters. To apply for re-entry, students must meet requirements outlined in the Student Handbook.    

Academic Dismissal 

  • Academic dismissal will also be recommended when at any point during a student’s  probationary  status it is mathematically impossible for the student to attain a cumulative GPA of 2.0, within the prescribed probationary period.  
  • A student who has been suspended or dismissed from the college may submit an appeal in writing to the VPAA/Dean.   

 

 

Class Accommodations and Alterations to Academic Programs for Students with Disabilities 

(Approved by the APC on 5/12/21)

Class Accommodations

Students registered with the Office of Disability Services (ODS) may request (and subsequently be approved for) specific accommodations to aid their work in one or more of their classes. These accommodations typically involve reasonable modifications to how students participate in their classes and how they complete their class work. They do not involve changes in the content of the course. Examples of standard accommodations include extended testing time, note-taking services, and assistive technology allocation. A less typical accommodation may be permission to take a specific class for a Pass/Fail grade or other grading considerations. In any case in which an accommodation requires waiving an academic policy that is published in the Academic Catalog, final approval rests with the VPAA/Dean.

Academic Program Alterations

Students registered with ODS may also request alterations to their academic programs based on a documented learning disability that warrants such an alteration. An academic alteration takes the form of a reasonable adjustment to a student’s academic program (major, concentration, minor, general education requirement) to allow for a more accessible and inclusive educational experience. Examples of such alterations include waiving a specific requirement and/or substituting it with a different course. Such an alteration must not fundamentally alter the program’s essential requirements and/or the nature of the program or its core learning goals and outcomes. In order for an alternative course to be approved, the student must be qualified for that course and meet its prerequisites. If the alteration request is approved, ODS follows the process below to identify appropriate alterations to the student’s academic program. Final approval of any alternation(s) to a student’s academic program rests with the VPAA/Dean.

Process for Requesting Accommodation in One or More Classes

For students who are requesting accommodation in one or more of their semester classes due to a documented learning disability, the process for approval is as follows:

  • The student registers with ODS, submitting required documentation and specific accommodation request(s). Students already registered with ODS may also submit a supplemental request.
  • The student meets with ODS to review the request.
  • ODS determines what accommodations can be provided and prepares the Accommodation Letter, which is sent to the student’s professors and filed on the ODS portal, Accommodate.
  • Typically, requests for accommodation in one or more classes must be submitted to ODS no later than two weeks prior to the start of the semester in which the accommodation is being requested. Typically, faculty are notified of any approved accommodations no later than one week prior to the start of the semester.
  • When a request is made for an accommodation other than those that are typically provided (i.e., extended testing time, note-taking services, and assistive technology allocation), ODS discusses it with the department chair(s), professor(s), and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs prior to approving it.
  • When the accommodation includes any modification to the class’s grading, it must be approved by the VPAA/Dean, and the professor must be notified as early in the semester as possible. When a request to take a class for a Pass/Fail grade is approved, the student must complete the Pass/Fail Option Request and submit it no later than the end of the Program Change period.


Process for Requesting Alterations to an Academic Program

For students who are requesting alterations to their academic programs due to a documented learning disability, the process for approval is as follows:

  • The student registers with ODS, submitting required documentation and specific alteration request(s). Students already registered with ODS may also submit a supplemental request.
  • The student meets with ODS to review the request.
  • ODS consults with the academic department chair(s) and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs to identify possible alterations.
  • Proposed alterations must not fundamentally alter the program’s essential requirements and/or the nature of the program or its essential learning goals and outcomes.
  • Final approval of any alternation to a student’s academic program rests with the VPAA/Dean.
  • Once approved, ODS notifies the student and faculty advisor that the alteration has been approved and prepares an Accommodation Letter, which is filed on the ODS portal, Accommodate.

 

Attendance  

(Approved by APC, 12/2006; Amended by APC, 5/2016)  

The College will support the attendance policy of an instructor, provided that policy is clearly explained on the instructor’s syllabus. However, a student may not be permitted to begin attending a course after s/he has been reported as non-attending in the Dept. of Education Non-Attendance Report (EDNAR). Please send any student who first arrives after this report has been completed ,  to the Center for Student Services.   

Non-Attendance Due to Religious Observance 

It is the policy of the College to respect its members’ observance of their major religious holidays. Administrators and instructors responsible for the scheduling of required academic activities or essential services are expected to avoid conflict with such holidays as much as possible. Such activities include examinations, registration, and various deadlines that are a part of the Academic Calendar. When scheduling conflicts prove unavoidable, no student will be penalized for absence due to religious observance, and alternative means will be sought for satisfying the academic requirements involved. If a suitable arrangement cannot be worked out between the student and the instructor, they should consult the appropriate Chair. If an additional appeal is needed, it may be taken to the Vice President for Academic Affairs.  

Absences Due to Pregnancy or Related Conditions 

Marymount Manhattan College does not discriminate against any student on the basis of pregnancy or related conditions. Absences due to medical conditions relating to pregnancy will be excused for as long as deemed medically necessary by a student’s doctor and students will be given the opportunity to make up missed work. Students needing assistance can seek accommodations from the Title IX Coordinator, Desiree Sholes (  dsholes@mmm.edu, 212-517-0560).  

Absence Due to Military Service 

Students who receive military orders for active duty or deployment will receive “W” (Withdrawal) grades for the term. An exception to this policy can be made if a student receives military orders after the eleventh week of classes, has completed approximately 80% of the assignments, and can reach an agreement with the faculty (at the faculty member’s discretion) about how missed work will be made up.  Annual Training (AT) or other normal training orders are not considered mobilization or active duty orders. Students who receive orders for Annual Training should make a formal request to postpone their orders until the end of the term. If their request for postponement is denied, and the student and faculty member can come to an agreement about how the missed work will be made up, then the student may remain eligible for credit and grades without penalty for absences due to routine training.  For more information, please see the Military Withdrawal Policy.  

 

Credit Hour Policy  

( Approved by APC 11/2015 )  

Marymount Manhattan College degree programs are approved by the New York State Education Department (NYSED). The College’s method for awarding credit for courses in degree programs follows NYSED guidelines, which are based on the U.S. Department of Education’s definition of credit hour.   

The faculty of the College are responsible for all aspects of the curriculum and degree program requirements. The College has a curriculum committee that reviews proposed new and revised courses and degree programs, including the credit hours associated with each.  

 

NYSED – Credit Hour Definition

All courses and degree programs at the College must comply with Section 50.1 (o) of the New York State Commissioner of Education Regulations:   

  • Semester hour means a credit, point, or other unit granted for the satisfactory completion of a course which requires at least 15 hours (of 50 minutes each) of instruction and at least 30 hours of supplementary assignments, except as otherwise provided pursuant to section 52.2(c)(4) of this Subchapter. This basic measure shall be adjusted proportionately to translate the value of other academic calendars and formats of study in relation to the credit granted for study during the two semesters that comprise an academic year.   

 

U.S. Department of Education – Credit Hour Definition

The U.S. Department of Education defines credit hour as an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than:   

  • One hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work for approximately fifteen weeks for one semester or trimester  hour of credit, or ten to twelve weeks for one quarter hour of credit, or the equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time; or,   
  • At least an equivalent amount of work as required in paragraph (1) of this definition for other academic activities as established by the institution, including laboratory work, internships,  practica , studio work, and other academic work leading to the award of credit hours.  

   

Middle States Accreditation   

Marymount Manhattan College is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE).  

MSCHE issued a “credit hour policy” in August 2012 that requires MSCHE institutions to comply with the U.S. Department of Education’s definition of “credit hour.” MSCHE also noted in the statement that institutions must provide this information to the Commission’s evaluators “at appropriate points of accreditation review so they can verify compliance with the credit hour regulations.”  

 

Policy 

Today there are many types of educational experiences with which credit hour assignment may properly be associated.  In the interest of accurate academic measurement, the following definitions and practices pertaining to the relationship between contact and credit hours apply. Courses may be composed of any combination of elements described, such as a lecture course which also has required laboratory periods or a lecture course having an additional requirement for supervised independent study or tutorial activity.  

A credit hour is normally granted for satisfactory completion of 12.5 hours of classroom instruction with a normal expectation of 25 hours of outside study per credit over the course of the term. The standard academic period is a 14-week semester with standard instructional time of two 81-minute sessions or one 171-minute session per week.   

 

Credit hours are granted for various types of instruction as follows: 

  1. In-Class Lecture, Seminar,  Discussion A credit hour is an academic unit earned for a minimum of 12.5 hours of classroom instruction with a normal expectation of 25 hours of outside study per credit over the course of the term.   
  2. Online and Hybrid Courses Below are three types of online courses:  
    1. Type 1: On-line courses with no classroom meetings that share equivalent student learning objectives and expectations for student effort as face-to-face sections of the course: The on-line section is assigned the same credit hours as the face-to-face section.  
    2. Type 2: On-line courses that include an in-class component (i.e. hybrid courses) with equivalent student learning objectives and expectations for student effort as a fully face-to-face section if the course: The hybrid section is assigned the same credit hours as the face-to-face section. 
    3. Type 3: Online and hybrid courses that do not have corresponding face-to-face sections for comparison: The department providing the course must document the expected level of student effort, expected student/faculty interactions, course assessment plan, and student learning objectives for the course along with proposed credit hours. This information will be reviewed by the Curriculum Committee and the VPAA/Dean for approval of the proposed credit hours.  
  3. Activity supervised as a group (laboratory, field trip, practicum, workshop, group studio)A credit hour is awarded for the equivalent of fourteen periods of such activity, where each activity period is 160 minutes or more in duration with little or no outside preparation expected. Where such activity involves substantial outside preparation by the student, the equivalent of fourteen periods of 110 minutes duration each will earn one semester credit hour.
  4. Supervised individual activity (independent study, individual studio, tutorial, research)One credit for independent study (defined as study which is given initial faculty guidance followed by repeated, regularly scheduled individual student conferences with a faculty member, and periodic as well as final evaluation of student performance) will be awarded for the equivalent of 37.5 hours of student academic activity.
  5. Experiential Learning At its discretion, MMC may award credit hours for learning acquired outside the institution which is an integral part of a program of study. When life or work experience is to be credited as a concurrent portion of an academic program design, as in an internship, one credit hour will be awarded for each 40-hour period of supervised activity that provides the learning considered necessary to program study plus 5 hours of outside study.  
  6. Miscellaneous At its discretion, MMC may award credits for mastery demonstrated through credit-by-examination. When such credit by examination is allowed, it may be used to satisfy degree requirements or to reduce the total number of remaining hours required for a degree.  MMC may also award credits through Prior Learning Assessment; see  http://www.mmm.edu/academics/about-the-program.php  for information.  

 

Appeal and Review 

Faculty may present educational justification for departures from these policy provisions to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Credit hours to be earned in approved international academic programs will continue to be considered on an individual basis following established procedures. Other special arrangements suggested by partner institutions will be considered on an individual basis by the Office of Academic Affairs.  

 

Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)  

(from the U.S. Department of Education)  

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) govern our responsibilities to our students. There are two basic regulations to which we must adhere:  

Individuals, who are independent* and have attained maturity in the eyes of the law (18 years of age), have the expectation of privacy with regard to their whereabouts, educational records (including grades), behavior, and any other information that may be known to us, as faculty  members, staff or administrators of an institution of higher learning, unless those individuals have waived those rights by making a written statement to do so in a specific authority or agency.  

For example, students applying for law school usually supply to MMC written authorization to disclose information about her/his disciplinary record, while in attendance at MMC, as part of a law school application. Such authorization does not permit MMC to disclose such information or any information to any institution other than the one named in authorization.  

Faculty, staff, and administrators may not discuss any matter concerning any student (who has attained 18 years of age) with any individual, including a parent, without the express written consent of the student. This regulation holds for informal as well as formal discussions, meetings, telephone conversations, written correspondence, etc.  

If you are contacted by a parent, spouse, employer, sibling, or guardian of any student, you must invoke FERPA and gently end the conversation. If the individual who has made the contact is not satisfied by your response, you may refer that individual to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. You should never sidestep the law.  

Occasionally law enforcement officials seek information about particular students. If you are ever contacted by a law enforcement agency or official, you should always refer those individuals directly to the VPAA/Dean.  

*Students, who are dependents of their parents, are not necessarily covered by FERPA; however, you may not accept a parent’s word that his/her daughter is a dependent. The Center for Student Services can confirm the student’s status.  

All staff and faculty will need to complete EEO, FERPA and Sexual Harassment training on an annual basis.  

 

Grades  

 

Grading Policy 

(from the  MMC College Catalogue )  

The grading policy for the College is described below and also appears in the College Catalogue. The manner in which you arrive at final grades for your students is up to you and must be explained in your course syllabus. It is recommended you confer with your Chair on your grading policy. It is also a good idea to review the grading policy verbally with your students in an early meeting of the class. It is wise to create a variety of opportunities for assessment of student performance: for example, daily or weekly quizzes, quick in-class writing assignments, short student presentations – so that students remain closely connected to the course and its materials. Faculty are encouraged to conduct assessment of the learning goals of the course early in the term and provide prompt feedback to the student. For students whose performance puts them at risk of failure in the course, submission of an Academic Alert notice is crucial.     

Determining Grades 

(from the MMC College Catalogue)  

For students who have completed the course, faculty may assign letter grades “A” through “F” or “P” if the course is graded Pass/Fail or if the student has elected the Pass/Fail option. This option must have been chosen by the student by the end of add/drop period. Reminder:  Students may not elect to take either Core courses or requirements in their major under the Pass/Fail option.  

For students who are taking the course as an audit, assign the grade “AU.”  Information on auditors can be found in the College Catalogue.  

For students who did not complete the course by no longer attending, faculty will assign the letter “N.” After all grades are submitted, CSS staff will run a report on the “N” grades and convert them to “F.” Students who received all “F” grades for a given semester will have their financial aid recalculated to the mid-point of the semester, as permitted by federal law. The policy on student withdrawal from a course(s) is described in detail in the College Catalogue.

 

Policy on Incomplete Grades (INC)

(Approved by APC 10/ 2021)

Faculty may assign an Incomplete grade (INC) under the following conditions:

  • The grade must be requested by the student in writing (via email) prior to the close of the grade submission period for the semester in which it is being requested. While faculty may suggest that a student consider requesting an Incomplete grade, they may not assign an Incomplete grade without a written request from the student.
  • The student has completed the majority of assigned coursework and unexpected extenuating circumstances (i.e., serious medical or personal reasons beyond their control), prevent the student from completing final assignments (final paper, report, examination, presentation, or other end-of-semester work).

 

It is at the discretion of the faculty to determine if the specific conditions warrant assigning an Incomplete or assigning a final grade based on all of the work that the student completed by the end of the semester. When granting a request for an Incomplete, it is incumbent upon the faculty to provide written confirmation (via email) of the work outstanding and the timeline/process for completing and submitting it. This timeline must adhere to the deadlines for converting Incompletes to final grades that are identified on the Academic Calendar.

All Incomplete grades must be converted to final grades by the Registrar no later than thirty (30) days after the last day of the term (Fall, January, Spring, Summer I, and Summer II). These specific dates are identified each year on the Academic Calendar. It is incumbent upon the faculty and student to establish a timeline by which:

  • The student submits completed outstanding work to the faculty;
  • The faculty grades this work and submits an Incomplete Change of Grade form to the Registrar no later than three (3) business days prior to the Incomplete conversion deadline stated in the Academic Calendar.

A student may request an extension of this thirty-day deadline for a maximum of an additional two weeks by submitting this request in writing (via email) to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at least five (5) business days before the Incomplete conversion deadline. The Associate Dean will confer with the faculty member and inform the student of their decision via email. The decision of the Associate Dean is considered final.

 

Grade Appeal Policy 

One of the most essential assets of our higher education system is the imaginative and resourceful atmosphere encouraged by the existence of academic freedom on campus.   As part of such freedom, faculty members have accepted the responsibility, in concert with their colleagues, to design and approve the curriculum.  They have selected instructional materials, elucidated course goals, and determined the method of evaluation of student performance in their classes.  Therefore, faculty should be afforded the highest degree of autonomy possible, though students should be provided with a procedure for addressing grade disputes.    

As an institution, Marymount Manhattan College asserts that grades earned by a student reflect the quality of his/her academic performance, as judged by the instructor of the course; in the spirit of academic freedom, the course instructor should have sole responsibility for determining all academic grades.   

The institution recognizes that, though rare, a student may feel that his/her work has been graded unfairly, or that his/her grade is based on some standard other than academic performance in the course in question.  In such cases, the Grade Appeal Procedure offers the student a vehicle by which to seek clarification and/or resolution. Only instructors have the authority to change a grade unless a review and change of grade determination occurs through the Academic Review Committee.  

(See the complete  Grade Appeals  policy and procedures )  

 

Overtallies and Wait List  

( Approved by APC  August/2010 )  

During the early registration period of each upcoming semester (Fall and Spring), students may waitlist themselves into a closed course section using MMC Connect. Towards the end of this period, each waitlisted course is reviewed by the Chair of the appropriate Division, who will then grant permission on Colleague to those students who may be permitted to join the course. These students will be notified by email and must register themselves within a given period of time. Following such a review, all waitlists will be closed, and students who still wish to be  overtallied  into a closed course section must now do so by contacting the divisional chair directly. If approved, the Office of Academic Advisement will be notified by email or other written means, and upon the consent of the student, Advisement or the Registrar will permit the student to register for the approved seat.    

 

Prior Learning Assessment  

( Approved by APC  August 2012 0  

Prior Learning Assessment is a process through which students may earn credit for college-level learning previously acquired through employment, professional experience, or other training and study. Credit is given only for prior learning that corresponds to a particular course offered at MMC. To apply for credit, students prepare a portfolio to be assessed by the faculty, which provides evidence of achievement of the learning goals for course(s) for which the student is seeking credit.  

The standard of student achievement for awarding PLA credit is the same as that applied to a student taking the MMC course in the classroom.  The faculty evaluator may interview a student or request additional materials before writing the evaluation.  The criteria for evaluating a portfolio include the following:  

  • Credible Authenticity:  the products submitted for evaluation (articles, documents, recording, etc.) must be the student’s own work.  If the student has a secondary involvement or responsibility for the activity or outcome, this must be made clear and the student’s actual role clearly attributed and assessed.  
  • Degree of the Breadth and Depth:  credit is awarded for the degree and quality of learning acquired, not for the amount of experience accrued.  The portfolio should address growth and progress in level of difficulty and expertise as well as the student’s ability to connect his/her learning to the concepts and content of the academic discipline(s) in which the student seeks credit.  The learning presented for assessment must be college-level work:  that is, it must have the scope, complexity and content commensurate with academic course work at the level for which credit is sought.  
  • Quality of Learning:  this includes the quality of the written narrative; the degree to which the student is able to articulate the learning goals of the equivalent course and relate them to Prior Learning; the quality of the products submitted for documentation as assessed by their complexity, difficulty and level of professionalism; the depth of knowledge acquired through Prior Learning as evidenced by specific examples where the student has engaged critical thinking and/or creative processes in a significant manner.  

The process for applying for Prior Learning Assessment is as follows:  the student meets with an advisor in the Student Success Advising Office for a general assessment of the viability of pursuing credits for prior learning within the context of his/her degree requirements.   If deemed viable, the student then meets with his/her Student Success Advisor to determine which course(s) could be completed through Prior Learning Assessment.  Student and advisor complete the top half of the “Prior Learning Assessment Application Form” and the student submits it to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.  The student then meets with the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs to review the application; if approved, s/he determines which division might best evaluate a student’s work. The student subsequently meets with the appropriate division chair, who will determine who among the full-time faculty can  evaluate the student’s work, and provides the student with copies of the relevant course syllabi.  Once an evaluator has been identified, the sponsoring faculty member and the division chair sign the bottom of the “Prior Learning Assessment Application Form,” then the student returns it to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, who signs and files the form with the Registrar, which triggers the student to be registered for PLA 001, a placeholder that lasts one semester and does not involve billing.     

After registering, the student creates a portfolio and submits it to the faculty supervisor, normally within one year of registering for PLA 001.  A portfolio evaluation normally takes three to four weeks. After reviewing the portfolio, the faculty supervisor completes the “PLA Credit Submission Form” and indicates whether full, partial or no credit will be awarded.  The faculty supervisor returns this form to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs with the portfolio. Upon submission of the form, the student is billed per credit assessed (not on how many credits are awarded). Course credit earned through PLA will appear on the student’s transcript as “Life Experience.”  A student may appeal the outcome of a PLA evaluation through the same procedure by which a student would appeal a grade for a course at MMC.  (See Grade Appeal Policy.)  

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT, CONTACT ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS LAURA TROPP (ltropp@mmm.edu)

Return to Table of Contents


SECTION VI.   MMC  PROCEDURES FOR FACULTY  

 

The Procedures described below have been developed and revised over time by teams of faculty and staff at MMC to ensure the safety and security of all MMC personnel and effective communication among administrators and faculty and faculty and students with regard to overall operations and the submission of required reports.  

Alcoholic Beverages  

  Alcoholic beverages are prohibited at all student events sponsored by students or by the Division of Student Affairs.  Alcoholic beverages are permitted to be served at all other events by a licensed bartender hired through Marymount Manhattan Dining by  Chartwells  

Absence from Class  

Faculty are expected to conduct all class sessions for their courses each semester. Classes should not be cancelled indiscriminately. However, if an emergency arises or if you are ill, please contact your Division Chair immediately, who will attempt to arrange for a substitute. Please then go to  MMC Connect and click on “Cancel Daily Class.”  Students will be apprised via the MMC website that your class will not meet that day. You will be expected to make up the missed class session.  

If you cannot access a computer, notify the Center for Student Services (CSS) at 517-0501 or 517-0502.  Whether you cancel your class via the MMC website or the CSS, your Division Chair must be notified.    

Faculty members are expected to make arrangements to make up a class, but not necessarily by scheduling an additional meeting. Because finding a suitable time is so difficult, given space and other scheduling constraints, faculty may instead assign an independent project of some variety to make up for the lost time.   

If you cannot reach the CSS by telephone for an early morning, evening, or a Saturday class, please call or email your students directly and send a copy to the Division Chair. Their telephone numbers are on your class roster. Please confirm the accuracy of these numbers and consider obtaining their business/mobile telephone numbers as well. It would be a courtesy to call your students,  so they do not have to make the trip to the College to learn that the class has been cancelled. This is especially important for working adults who may be making the trip for your class only.   

Alternatively, you can email your students individually or as a broadcast message from Brightspace. Please be sure to email your Division Chair whenever a class meeting is canceled.  

 

Reporting Non-Attendance (EDNAR)  

 

Reporting Non- Attendance as required by the U. S. Department of Education (ED):  The EDNAR  

Each term the Registrar collects data on students who have registered in order to determine if they are attending, never attended or stopped attending all of their classes. This information assists the College in determining the Census numbers and directly impacts a student’s financial aid eligibility.  Faculty’s assistance in accurately reporting your students is vital and necessary.  

However, beyond this one time recording of attendance, each faculty member should keep attendance records for every class session for other reasons:  

  • Grading —especially if you award credit for class participation and need to know who has participated.  
  • The Registrar may request the last date a student attended or submitted assignments.   
  • The Business Office may request information for the last date a student attended for tuition refund/credit purposes.  

 

MMC is not required to maintain a daily record of attendance. However, we need an absolutely accurate record of students who have not attended class at all or who stopped attending and the last date attended or date when assignments were submitted.   If your class is taught online, “attendance” is determined by the number of times the student accesses your online site.  

Special Note on EDNAR and Final Grades:   When reporting final grades for the term, faculty can mark a student with an N (unofficial withdrawal) grade to indicate the student had stopped attendance by providing a last date of attendance or by flagging the “Never Attended” box*.  

* Faculty who mark a student as “Never Attended” when submitting final grades should report the same attendance data given at the time of EDNAR submission.  For example, if a faculty gives an N final grade and indicate “Never Attended” for a student, the faculty should have marked Never Attended on his/her EDNAR submission on the class roster.  

Any discrepancies between final grades and EDNAR reporting may affect a student’s financial aid.  Faculty will be contacted for clarification.   Detailed instructions are sent electronically each term as the reporting date approaches.  

 

Audio/Video Equipmen t (How to Request)  

Most classrooms are equipped with VCR and DVD players. On the occasion where such equipment is needed, the Library will supply it with at least 24 hours’ notice for scheduling. Equipment of all types is issued to faculty and staff only. If a student needs AV equipment the professor should make the request to Jordan Horsley, Coordinator of Media, in advance. Check-out and return takes place on the same day and is concluded before the closing of the library. If any further information or clarification is needed, please call x805.   

 

Access to Classrooms  

Security is responsible for ensuring that classrooms are open for the classes scheduled. However, should you find your classroom locked, please contact Security at x411 to unlock the door.  

 

Admittance to the MMC Campus  

Access to the College beyond the main lobby security desk is available only to persons with proper MMC ID. Faculty are instructed on how to obtain an MMC ID on or around their start date. Each calendar year, the MMC ID is updated each year with a sticker by the Security Staff.  

All guests must sign in at the security desk, indicate their destination, and receive a Day Pass. If a faculty, staff, or student is hosting a visitor for the day, he/she will be accountable for the behavior of his/her guest.  

 

Class Rosters  

Class rosters are available via the Faculty Portal.   To Access the Faculty Portal, click  MyMMC on the top of the MMC Home Page and log in. Under the “Faculty Applications” section in the middle of the screen, click “My Course listings” for instructions on how to use MMC Connect to create your Rosters.  

Class Rosters will help you confirm that only students registered for your class are attending.  

If a student has applied for a “Preferred Name Change”, the  Preferred name will appear on the Roster.  

If a student has registered late or has changed his/her program after the start of classes, that information will be available to you on the continuously updated version of your roster. Students may also be able to produce their approved Registration Agreement Form or Program Change (PC) Form, which can confirm late registration and the student’s official enrollment in your course.  

Students may not be permitted to remain in class if:  

  • Their official or preferred names are not listed on the current version of the roster, or  
  • They cannot produce a copy of their Registration Agreement Form or Program Change (PC) Form confirming their late registration.   

Note: Students who are auditing the course are still required to either register online, file a registration agreement, or program change form. 

The official period for adding and dropping classes is published in the course bulletin. Since this is the only time during which students may alter their registration, it is imperative that you immediately send any student who is not on your current roster to the Center for Student Services to file a program change ( PC) form. The staff in the CSS will make every attempt to assist the student to resolve registration problems.  In special cases, the department or division chair may need to approve the program change form.  Student Success Advisors will be available to consult with students who may need to make program changes.  

Equally important, the names of students who are listed on the roster but who do not appear for class during the first two weeks of classes, which coincides with the program change period, must be reported as not in attendance on the U.S. Department of Education (ED) Non-Attendance Report (EDNAR). Instructions for submitting this report are sent to faculty each term or semester. All faculty must submit an EDNAR for each class regardless of whether or not all students are in attendance.  

Remember:  Students must be registered in order to receive a grade or credit for a course. However, students whose names remain on the roster, and who have not been in attendance, must be assigned an “N” grade at the end of the semester. The “N” grade represents an official withdrawal and will be converted to an administrative “UW” grade. The N/UW grades will be tabulated as a failing grade.   

We encourage you to download and print a roster from MMC Connect regularly throughout the semester to determine the most current status of any student originally enrolled for your course; that is, your updated roster will inform you about whether or not a student has withdrawn from your course.   

 

Classroom Visitors and Invited Guests Policy (for all delivery methods)

Marymount Manhattan College is committed to preserving a safe and academically-focused classroom environment while remaining accessible to the community it serves. The College encourages safe, supervised campus visits by members of the public for the purposes of engaging in College sanctioned events, exploring educational opportunities and making decisions about their academic future.

For purposes of this policy, the following definitions are used:

  1. Classroom Visitor is a person who has no affiliation with the College. A classroom visitor has never been admitted to the college and has never enrolled in classes;
  2. Classroom Minor Visitor is anyone who meets the definition of classroom visitor AND is under the age of 18;
  3. Classroom Invited Guest is a person who has no affiliation with the College but is invited by the classroom faculty to participate in classroom activities for the purpose of student educational enrichment. 

Any classroom visitation, beyond those sanctioned by the College, may be permitted with the following precautions and limitations, which are intended to protect health and safety, maintain productivity and comply with regulations.

  1. Visitation to a classroom (on-campus or via Zoom) must be for the purpose of investigating future attendance, participating in an official college sanctioned event, or by invitation of the classroom faculty.
  2. Classroom visitors are at the discretion of the classroom faculty.
  3. .Classroom visitor/minor visitor emails professor of class no later than one week prior.
  4. For in-person visits, faculty should notify Campus Safety via email at least 24 hours in advance of the name, date(s) and time of visit, and classroom location for all invited guests to adhere to safety response standards.
  5. Classroom visitors/minor visitors are restricted to attending one session of any individual class.6
  6. The conduct of a classroom visitor, minor visitor, the parent, legal guardian, or adult representative of a minor visitor, and/or invited guest shall not interfere with the educational process or learning environment, and all are expected to abide by all operational regulations and guidelines, including safety and access restrictions.
  7. The college reserves the right to revoke visitation permission at any time.

Contact Information  

At the time of your hire, you will be asked to complete a Faculty Contact Sheet.    If your address changes, after we have received your personal and contact information, please complete the Change of Address form available on the MMC website and complete a new W-4. Failure to do so may result in a lost paycheck.   

Contracts  

Tenured and tenure-track faculty are sent an annual contract for the next academic year at the end of March preceding that year. Faculty are asked to sign and return the contract to the Office of Academic Affairs at that time.  

Course Cancellations  

The College must reserve the right to cancel those classes it deems insufficiently enrolled. Decisions on cancellations are made by the Vice President for Academic Affairs in consultation with the Divisional Chair. Undersubscribed courses are cancelled as soon as possible before the semester begins but may be cancelled as late as the day before classes begin. Programmatic need as well as anticipated late student registration is carefully considered before decisions are made. Faculty members are notified by the Chair of their Division; students are notified by the Center for Student Services.  

Academic Alert Notification  

(For instruction, see video at https://mmm.app.box.com/s/czek95csxe0rdqup4ykneag2l4cq0ld0 )  

Within the first few weeks of each semester, faculty members are asked to inform the Office of Academic Advisement of students who might be experiencing difficulty in individual courses. Academic Alert is an academic warning system used to report students who, due to poor academic performance or sporadic class attendance, are in danger of failing. Through the use of this system, students who find themselves at risk of failing one or more courses are able to receive appropriate individual advisement support. In order for the Academic Advisement staff to intervene in an appropriate and effective fashion, faculty members are strongly encouraged to submit Academic Alert Notices prior to mid-semester. However, should problems arise subsequent to the mid-semester, faculty are encouraged to file the notice at that time. 

Academic Alert Notices are submitted electronically through MMC Connect. For instructions, see video link above. 

End-of-Term Course Evaluations  

Course evaluations are administered to students each semester. Towards the end of the semester, evaluations with instructions are sent by the Office of Academic Affairs to the faculty for distribution in class. The completed forms are to be delivered to the Office of Academic Affairs by a student. After the semester has ended and final grades have been submitted the report gets reviewed by the Divisional Chair or Department Chair with the faculty member. The College believes that course evaluations are an important measure of student learning for the faculty member and the College.   

( See  End-of-Term Course Evaluation Form )  

 

Faculty-Led Travel Course


Marymount Manhattan College encourages faculty to design and implement Faculty-Led Travel Courses (FLTC), both domestic and abroad, across the breadth of the curriculum. Marymount recognizes that these courses provide opportunities for students to link course content with travel for an invaluable educational experience.

In designing and planning an FLTC, the faculty should try to ensure that:

  1. the proposed structure of the program, as measured by timing, length and program cost, is in the best interests of the participants;
  2. the program is academically sound and will provide each participant significant opportunities for learning;
  3. all internal approvals, including the curriculum committee (if needed), the Divisional Chair and the VPAA/Dean are obtained;
  4. the program will allow the participants opportunities to explore the cultural, intellectual and social features of the location(s) visited; and
  5. the location of the program will not pose an unreasonable threat or jeopardize the safety and well-being of the participants.

Careful planning for these courses is important to not only provide a rewarding academic, cultural, and social experience for the participants but also to avoid the risk of liability to Marymount Manhattan College and its employees. The Office of the Vice President of Academic Affairs works closely with the Division Chair and the Coordinating Professor(s) to plan these programs in order to provide students with the opportunity to participate and succeed in FLTC.


Faculty-Led Travel Courses can last anywhere from 2 days to up to 3 weeks. They are distinguished from field trips in that they typically involve planning for both transportation and lodging. The policies and procedures contained within this document have been designed to provide clear and consistent procedures for all MMC faculty planning a Faculty-Led Travel Course.

Proposal Review Process

The Coordinating Professor(s) are required to submit a Program Proposal prior to the course being placed in Colleague for student registration. The procedure for submitting the proposal is outlined below:

The program proposal should be prepared and submitted to the Division Chair where the course is housed at least 10 months prior to the start of the session/term when the course will run.

The proposal will include:

    1. Name of the course
    2. Course description
    3. Draft of course syllabus
    4. Semester in which the course will be offered
    5. Travel location(s)
    6. Tentative travel dates
    7. Names of coordinating professors
    8. Credit-structure
    9. Preliminary budget data

After reviewing the FLTC Proposal, the Division Chair may elect to meet with the faculty member to further refine the proposal or forward the proposal directly to the Associate Vice President for Academic Administration (AVP) for review and approval.

The AVP will review the proposal for logistical, legal, and budgetary issues. The AVP may consult with other College administrators where necessary when reviewing the proposal. If the trip will involve international travel, the AVP will ask the MMC Study Abroad Coordinator to review the proposal. If additional clarifications are needed, the AVP will coordinate a meeting with the Coordinating Professor and the Divisional Chair.

Upon review and approval by the AVP, the proposal will be forwarded to the VPAA/Dean for review and approval. If approved, the VPAA/Dean (or designee) will inform the faculty member of such approval and copy the Divisional Chair.  If the proposal does not meet the established criteria, recommendations will be made for changes and the proposal will be sent back to the Coordinating Professor(s) and Divisional Chair for modification.

Step

Time Frame

ONE: Submission of Proposal Division Chair for approval

At least 10 months prior to start date of the session within which the travel will occur

TWO: Division review of the proposal

Up to 1 month

THREE: VPAA Office review of the proposal

Up to 2 weeks

FOUR:  Approval/Denial of the proposal by the VPAA/Dean

Up to 6 weeks after receipt of proposal

FIVE:  Student Application for FLTC Available

Start of registration period for session within which the travel course will take place

SIX: Selection of travel agency and on-site coordinator vendors

6-8 months prior to start date of session within which the travel course will occur

SEVEN:  Student Application deadline

End of formal registration period for that session

EIGHT:  Faculty member advises student, they are approved to register for the course

No later than two (2) weeks after the application deadline

NINE:  Faculty member provides CSS with a list of students approved for the FLTC

No later than two (2) weeks after the application deadline

TEN: In-person Registration for FLTC, with 50% of course fee due at registration – paid at Center for Student Services (CSS)

Must be before any MMC payments due to vendors

ELEVEN:  Final payment (50% remaining balance) due – paid at CSS

Must be before any MMC payments due to vendors

TWELVE:  Distribution of Final Itinerary and course syllabus to students

1 month prior to departure date

THIRTEEN:  Conduct student orientation

1 month prior to departure

FOURTEEN: Finalize travel roster and distribute with contact information to key parties

1 month prior to departure date

FIFTEEN:  Issuance of MMC credit card for faculty use

2 weeks prior to departure date

Policies for Faculty-Led Travel Courses

  1. Each Faculty-Led Travel Course must be led by at least one Coordinating Professor who is a full- time member of the MMC faculty and who will remain with the program throughout its duration.
  2. Faculty-Led Travel Courses that will travel to international destinations must have two (2) Coordinating Professors who will remain with the program throughout its entire duration.
  3. Program participants must be at least 18 years of age and be full-time MMC students.
  4. Spouses and children (who must be at least 18 years of age) of Coordinating Professors may travel with the program on a voluntary basis and will have no responsibility on behalf of MMC other than # 8 below. Marymount Manhattan College will not be responsible for any of the travel and/or other costs associated with these individuals.
  5. Minor children of Coordinating Professors may not travel with the group.
  6. All students who participate in international programs must have health, medical evacuation insurance and repatriation insurance that covers them while in a foreign country. All students who do not have adequate health coverage that covers them outside of the United States must purchase the study abroad group health insurance policy offered by MMC’s student health insurance provider.
  7. All students enrolled in a FLTC will pay the current MMC tuition rate and the specified course fee. Students may not register for the course for 0 credits.
  8. Non-Students who enroll in a FLTC are required to pay for at least 1 credit of tuition at the prevailing MMC per/credit tuition rate for the semester within which the course will be offered.
  9. MMC Alumni who enroll in a FLTC are required to pay for at least 1 credit of tuition at the prevailing MMC per/credit tuition rate for alumni for the semester within which the course will be offered.
  10. Fees for program expenses will be established when the proposal is submitted.
  11. All payments to agency vendors will be collected by MMC. MMC will then pay these vendors.
  12. Coordinating Professors are required to work with commercial travel agency or program providers in making travel and logistical arrangements for the duration of the course.
  13. Advertising and marketing for all FLTC will emphasize the instructional nature of the program.
  14. The Office of the Vice-President for Academic Affairs, in consultation with other key MMC offices and the Coordinating Professor(s) will decide if any FLTC shall be cancelled or terminated early because of a crisis or emergency.
  15. All existing MMC student policies and procedures apply for the duration of the FLTC. The Office of the Vice-President for Academic Affairs, in consultation with the Divisional Chair, Department Chair, and Coordinating Professor(s) may require that a student return home before the scheduled end of the program for good cause such as illness, disruption of activities, alcohol or drug use, involvement in illegal activities or violation of other MMC student policies.
  16. In the event of any emergency or crisis situation that arises during the trip, the Coordinating Professor(s) will first attempt to notify the Divisional Chair for the sponsoring department as soon as reasonably possible. In the event the Divisional Chair cannot be contacted, the Director of Academic Administration should be notified. The emergency notification chain for FLTC programs is as follows: Division Chair,  AVP, VPAA/Dean, and College President (if warranted).
  17. All contracts and agreements for services, equipment, lodging and other program-related expenses must be reviewed and approved by an MMC employee with appropriate contracting authority and must be processed based on current MMC policies and procedures.

Budget Planning

Note: To assist the Coordinating Professor(s) in developing the budget, the FLTC Template contains a budget worksheet template.

The program budget is an indicator of the feasibility and affordability of the program. Coordinating Professors are responsible for identifying all obvious participant costs and for developing the highest quality program at the lowest possible cost to the students. In planning a FLTC, Coordinating Professors should take into consideration the costs that a student will incur in the course of the trip. They will include tuition, transportation and lodging, meals and in all likelihood spending money.

Budget planning is critical to the success of the program and requires sufficient lead time to obtain approval. Once a Course Fee has been established and associated to the course in Colleague, it cannot be increased to cover enrollment shortfalls or other unanticipated costs. MMC policy does not permit the use of College funds to meet any revenue shortfall. As such, budget planning must be completed at the time the FLTC Proposal is submitted for approval. The AVP will work with each Coordinating Professor to develop a budget viable for the program.

Developing the Course Fee

All funds relating to any aspect of the FLTC must be handled in a manner consistent with MMC policies and procedures. Using the worksheet provided, the program budget must include all obvious travel course expenses so that an accurate course fee can be established. Program budgeting will be completed for the following:

  • Tuition: Monies collected from tuition (based on the number of credits each student registers for) will be collected as per existing MMC registration and student finance policies
  • Course Fee: All non-tuition costs for each FLTC will be paid for using a course fee. Students registered for the FLTC will be assessed a course fee to cover all non-salary-related MMC expenses. This can include transportation and lodging costs, and site and event fees such as entrance to museums and other cultural venues visited by the class. Course fees will also cover all Coordinating Professor(s) expenses for the duration of the trip. Course fees should also include a 10%-25% contingency fee, payable by all students that will assist MMC in addressing any unforeseen expenses.
  • After the conclusion of the FLTC and after a final accounting review, any unused course fees will be refunded to the participants based on existing MC policies for the semester within which the FLTC ran.

 

Determining Tuition Costs

The tuition cost for each student will be determined by multiplying the number of credits registered for by the student times the prevailing MMC per credit tuition charge

 

Determining the Course Fees

In determining Course fees, Coordinating Professors must set the fee with the understanding that (a) once established it cannot be increased and (b) MMC cannot cover any expense-related shortfalls. If after completion of the course, additional funds remain in the program account, MMC will recalculate the course fee and refund any surplus to the students.

In calculating the course fee, the Coordinating Professor(s) should include:

1. Student Costs:

    1. All airfare and airport transfers to and from each destination location
    2. All lodging costs at each point of stay for the duration of the trip
    3. All cultural and other excursion admissions and ticket costs cost that the Coordinating Professor(s) will pay for as a group
    4. All meal costs that the Coordinating Professor(s) plans to pay for as a group
    5. All in-country transportation costs the Coordinating Professor(s) plans to pay for as a group

2. Coordinating Professor Costs (for each coordinator)

    1. All airfare and airport transfers to and from each destination location
    2. Local transportation/parking cost incurred for travel to/from the airport, including mileage, if personal automobile is used
    3. All lodging costs at each point of stay for the duration of the trip
    4. Cultural/excursion admissions and/or ticket costs for each Coordinating Professor
    5. Meal costs for each Coordinating Professor

 

FLTC Financial Controls/Accounting Policies

 

Authority to Sign Contracts

Contractual agreements will be required for travel, lodging and tour guides. Some of these may be for large amounts of money. All, contractual agreements will require review and approval by the  AVP, the VPAA/Dean, and the Controller before they will be finalized. Coordinating Professors are not authorized to sign any contractual document.

Collection of Course fees

Coordinating Professors are not permitted to collect any course fees directly from students. Additionally, students may not pay any travel, lodging, or other expenses directly to 3 rd -party vendors. All course fees must be collected by the Center for Student Services (CSS) based on the timeline established in the FLTC proposal submitted by the Coordinating Professor and approved by MMC.

Pre-Payment of Program Costs

In most instances, it will be the desired policy of MMC to pay all program-related costs in advance of the trip’s departure date. All airfare and lodging costs must be contracted, approved and be fully paid prior to the trip’s departure using both purchase orders and check requests and in accordance with MMC policies and procedures.

Cash Advances

Where budgeted program costs cannot be pre-paid prior to the trip’s departure, the Coordinating Professor(s) may request a cash advance. The advance must be approved by the Divisional Chair, the AVP, and the VPAA/Dean. Coordinating Professors will be responsible for collecting all receipts while traveling and for the reconciliation of all accounting related to any cash advance upon return. The cash advance must be fully accounted for within ten (10) business days after the course has concluded following existing MMC procedures.

MMC-Issued Credit Card

For international trips, MMC will issue a time-limited credit card for use by Coordinating Professors in the event an emergency situation arises. Coordinating Professors will be responsible for accounting for all expenses charged to this card within ten (10) business days after the date of return. Coordinating Professors are responsible for collecting all receipts and invoices for charges made to this card during the trip.

 

Emergency Procedures  

Link to MMC Emergency Response Procedures :  

http://www.mmm.edu/offices/campus-safety/emergency-re sponse-plan.php  

Fire 

If you discover a fire in the building, activate the alarm by pulling the box handle on the floor on which the fire is located. This alarm will summon the New York City Fire Department; it will also alert other persons in the building to an emergency evacuation procedure. After activating an alarm, proceed to the nearest office or to Security personnel to inform them of the situation.    

Fire Drills 

Drills must be held at least three times every year. We ask your cooperation in not using the elevators and in leaving the building promptly.  

Medical Emergencies 

If a student becomes ill during your class, contact Campus Safety and the Office of Student Affairs. Campus Safety will call for an ambulance if requested by the student.  We ask that the student have a follow-up meeting with the Vice-President for Student Affairs or Student Affairs staff.  If you or another faculty member becomes ill on campus, please seek help in the most expeditious manner possible and notify or have someone notify your Chair, the Division administrative staff, and the Office of the VPAA.  

Other Emergency Situations  

In case of non-medical emergencies, please contact the Security Desk at Ext. 411. If you are not able to contact any college personnel, dial 911 immediately. The Security Desk, located in the main entrance lobby, is staffed 24 hours a day. Each elevator in the college is equipped with an emergency phone that connects directly to the Security Desk. Campus Safety personnel reports all emergencies, incidents, thefts, crimes, and other problems to the Director of Campus Safety/Supervisor. Anyone in the College community who witnesses a violation of College policies, crime, or any suspicious activity can also call the security tips hotline at (212) 774-4878. All calls are kept confidential.  

Response to Incidents 

All reported incidents are investigated immediately and, if corrective action is possible, remedied. A report is filed for every incident that occurs on College property. The reports are kept on file in the Security Office. In addition to responding to all incidents immediately, the Security Personnel will notify the Security Supervisor as soon as possible. In cases involving misconduct of a student, the Office of Student Affairs will also be notified.  

 

(See MMC  Campus Security Emergency Response Guide )  

 

Facilities Management (Reporting Facilities Problems)  

For the Carson Hall,  Nugent  Hall,  Faculty Center, and Martha Gr aham Studios:  

Any hot/cold temperature calls, repair requests, installations, furniture moves, special requests, etc. should be directed to ext. 449 or ext. 489. If no one picks up at either of those two extensions, please send an email with the request to rformosa@mmm.edu. In case of an emergency please call the front desk at ext. 411. (Security can reach maintenance by radio). 

 

Faculty Development Funds

Full-Time Faculty  

If you wish to apply for funding to attend or present at a conference or to enroll in a workshop or short course, review the instructions below and submit your application to the Office of Academic Affairs. The form is updated every year.   

 

Purpose  

The Faculty Development Fund is designed to promote teaching excellence and the research and creative endeavors of faculty members at Marymount Manhattan College. Requests may take the form of a presentation of one’s scholarly/creative work, conference attendance in which a faculty member has a unique function to perform, or attendance at a conference designed to assist faculty in developing curricula and improving their teaching. All full-time tenured and tenure-track faculty members are eligible to apply. Applications must be submitted prior to the event for which you are requesting funding. Multiple awards may be given to the same faculty member if funding is available.   

 

Proposal Evaluation and Funding Limits  

Conference Attendance may be funded if it meets one of these criteria:

  1.  A presentation of one’s scholarly/creative work is viewed as the initial presentation of original research or creative activity that has been invited or selected through a review process. This may take the form of a paper presentation, poster, exhibition, or performance. Additional presentations on the same topic will not be funded unless the applicant demonstrates a majority of the work is new. It is expected that the presentation will ultimately lead to a full scholarly publication or equivalent (exhibition, performance, major art show, etc.).  
  2. Conference attendance in which a faculty member has a unique function to perform may include such roles as a respondent to a panel, association officer, conference/event organizer, etc. 
  3. Attendance at a conference designed to assist faculty in developing curricula and improving their teaching includes participation in master classes, short courses and workshops. 

The Faculty Development Fund is designed to support activities that bring honor and recognition to the  college.  Current year  f unding  limits are   indicated in the policy   

If funding is approved but plans for presentation or attendance change, please notify the Office of Academic Affairs so that unexpended funds may be reallocated.   

 

(See Faculty Portal for   Full-Time Faculty Development Fund Request procedures and the Request Form) 

 

Adjunct Faculty  

 

Eligibility Guidelines  

An adjunct faculty member may apply for one (1) or a combination of three (3) grants per year from the fund, but not to exceed $750 on an individual or cumulative basis. To be eligible, the adjunct faculty member must have taught at least one (1) Fall or Spring semester at the College in each of the five (5) years immediately prior to a given semester. The funds may be used for research in his/her field, travel, room, board or other expenses incurred for verifiable active participation at an academic or professional conference or meeting.   

 

Application Process  

Applications are reviewed and approved at the start of the fall and  spring semesters. The Adjunct Faculty member must submit this application and supporting documentation to the Office of the Vice-President of Academic Affairs by September 15th for the Fall Semester and February 15th for the Spring Semester.  The Adjunct Faculty member may apply for funding for a conference they previously attended up to 3 months prior to the semester due date, but they should be aware that the availability of funds is limited. The VPAA/Dean (or designee) will review each application. Applicants will be notified of the decision in writing to approve or deny.   

 

(See  Faculty Portal for Guidelines for  Adjunct Faculty Development Fund Request .)  

 

Graffiti  

If faculty notice graffiti or hate messages anywhere on the premises, they should contact Security (Ext. 411) as soon as possible.   

 

Grade Submission  

  1. MMC Connect (for Faculty) – Go to OneLogin and click on MMC Connect.  
  2. Click on “MMC Connect for Faculty” and log in.   
  3. Click on “Grading.” Select the appropriate term and press “Submit.”  
  4. Click on “Final Grade.”  You will see a list of all courses you are teaching.  
  5. Choose one of the courses you are teaching. Then press “Submit.”  
  6. Input grade for each student; check over, and press “Submit.”  

If you submit any INC grades, you will complete an “Incomplete Clearance Plan” for each of them. The Plan should be signed by the faculty member and the student; alternatively, a copy of an email exchange between faculty and student can be sent to the Registrar.  

After you have submitted your grades via MMC Connect, you must go to the Center for Student Services and file a Grade Change Report to change a grade. The Report must be signed by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.  

You will have adequate time to input your grades electronically in MMC Connect, but not to calculate them or analyze them, so be ready to input only. If you have a large class, you may want to input half of the grades and submit; close the screen; open it again and input the other half.  

After you submit your grades, we recommend that you close the screen, and then reopen it to see that your grades are listed. Only then will you know for sure that you have completed the process correctly. You should print a copy at this point for your records.  

If you have any questions about grades, email or call Regina Chan , Registrar in the Center for Student Services (rchan@mmm.edu) or 212-517-050 1. If you have difficulties logging in to MMC Connect, please call the Help Desk at 212-517-0580 or email usersupport@mmm.edu.  

As the Center for Student Services staff is responsible for a variety of reports that depend on the timely submission of grades, it is very important to submit grades within the published timeframe each semester.  

 

Letter of Agreement ( Adjunct faculty only)  

 

Every term each part-time faculty member receives a Letter of Agreement (LOA) via MMC email indicating the following:  

  • Teaching assignment  
  • Guidelines for developing and submitting the syllabus  
  • Instructions for accessing the roster(s)  
  • Submitting the U.S. Dept. of Education Non-Attendance Report (EDNAR)   
  • Due dates for grades submission  
  • Pay dates and compensation for the semester of employment are available on ADP.    

A copy of this LOA must be signed and returned to the Office of Academic Affairs or you can click reply and accept the LOA via email.  

   

Mailboxes /Mailroom  

 

Please check with your Division administrative assistant as to the location of your mailbox. Should you have a mailbox in Lower Level Nugent, a rather open area, you are advised to be cautious about receiving and returning student papers via your mailbox. You may want to advise students to leave papers for you in a sealed envelope and, in turn, you return them to students in similar fashion. That way, passers-by are discouraged from helping themselves to term papers or otherwise private information on grades/evaluation that should be exchanged only between you and your students.  

The Mailroom is responsible for receiving and placing mail in these mailboxes. Mailroom personnel also handle all deliveries, incoming and outgoing mail as well as maintenance of copiers. Deliveries and pickups are done twice a day (morning/afternoon). Hours of operation are Monday - Friday 9:00am - 5:00pm. The  Mailroom can be reached at ext. 423. 

 

Military Leave Policy  

 

Military Leave Process 

Students on military leave who receive orders for active duty or deployment will receive “W” –Withdrawal grades for the term.    

  • The student must present a copy of their military orders to the Office of Academic Advisement and file a Total Withdrawal Form.  
  • Depending on when the student withdraws during the term, tuition, fees, and financial aid including veteran’s benefits may be adjusted.  
  • If the student has direct loans that are in an in-school status, an in-school deferment status, or in a grace period status, the student should call her/his loan servicer and request a “Military Grace Program” deferment. This option can extend the grace period of the loan up to three years and is only available to students withdrawing from college as a result of military recall or deployment.  
  • Students on military leave are encouraged to file a Maintenance of Matriculation form.  Filing for maintenance of matriculation will enable the student to remain in his/her original academic catalogue program. Maintenance of matriculation is only available for 2 consecutive semesters after which the student must apply to readmit.  A status of maintenance of matriculation allows a student who returns to Marymount Manhattan College, to retain the requirements in their catalog and not be subjected to new degree program requirements in the current academic catalog.  

 

Exceptions to Process 

  • If a student receives military orders after the eleventh week of classes, the student has the option not to withdraw from those classes for which the student and faculty have come to an agreement about how the student will complete the coursework and how the final grade will be calculated.  
  • Should a faculty member assign an incomplete grade, the student must follow the incomplete clearance plan between the student and faculty member.  The MMC incomplete grade policy remains in effect.  Failure to complete the assigned work, test, papers, and so forth, within the faculty member’s deadline, or the published last date to submit an incomplete grade will result in an “F”-failure grade.  
  • Routine Annual Training (AT) exercises or other routine training orders are not considered recall, mobilization or active duty orders. Students on routine annual training will need to comply with MMC’s General Attendance Policy – (refer to 2015-16 MMC Academic Catalogue page 179) which includes compliance with the faculty’s attendance policy. Failure to comply with MMC’s attendance policy can result in academic penalties.  If Annual Training impacts enrollment, students should make a formal request through their chain of command to postpone their orders until the end of the term. If their request for postponement is denied, and the student and faculty member can come to an agreement about how the missed work will be made up, then the student may remain eligible for credit and grades without penalty for absences due to routine training.  

 

MMC One Card, Email and Network Account  

 

Within a few days of completing employment paperwork, you will be given instructions on how to obtain an MMC One Card and activate your MMC network account.  

MMC OneCard is a mobile ID card accessed through the Touchnet OneCard app on your phone. Once the app has been downloaded, you will use your MMC OneCard to:

  • Add and use dining dollars;
  • Scan in for entry to MMC campus buildings; and
  • Check out books in the library

The MMC OneCard is environmentally friendly (no more plastic ID cards!) and eliminates the need for paying in cash or credit card at on-campus locations. 

Visit the OneCard web page for more information and instructions for downloading the app: https://www.mmm.edu/offices/information-technology/onecard/

Within a few days of completing employment paperwork, you will also be given instructions on how to activate your MMC network account. New faculty are sent a preliminary log-in and instructions on how to activate your network account. You must activate this account via your personal computer or a campus computer in your office or in a Division Office, the Nugent Lounge, or the Shanahan Library. Subsequently, your access to the network is accessible to you from any internet-equipped computer off campus, using your MMC network login and password. From off campus, you are able to access your MMC email and the MMC website, including MMC Connect. Hence you are able to complete the student non-attendance report (EDNAR), submit grades, enter textbook information, etc. You are not able to access documents saved on the P Drive from off-campus.

Your MMC network account is the only way we can communicate important information to you and the preferred way for you to communicate with MMC students. During terms when you teach, including January and Summer I and II, you will want to check your MMC network account once a week to receive important instructions and due dates for submissions throughout the term.

 

Multi-Purpose Machines  

 

Multi-Purpose machines for copying, printing and faxing are available for your use in the following locations:  

  1. Carson Hall: Lower Level, 501, Carson 6, and Carson 7  
  2. Nugent Hall: Theatre Office  
  3. Faculty Center: Floors 1, 3 and 5  

You can confer with your Division Support Staff on which machines offer fax as well as copy/print capabilities. In general, you can print to the multi-purpose machine closest to your office if you do not have a printer in your office. In order to copy or fax, you will also need to obtain the access code for your Department /Division from the Support Staff.  

 

Payroll  

 

Full-time faculty are paid bi-weekly and part-time faculty are paid 4 times during the fall and the spring semesters.  During the interim term, faculty are paid one time at the end of each winter, Summer I, Summer II, and Summer III sessions.  Adjunct faculty should consult their letter of agreement for the pay date(s) for the semester within which they are teaching.    

Your paycheck will be mailed at the end of the business day the Wednesday of pay week.  Those employees set up for direct deposit can expect their funds to be in their account the Thursday of pay week.  All employees are encouraged to sign up for direct deposit which can be done through the ADP HR/Payroll Portal.  A payroll schedule is available in the ADP HR/Payroll Portal.  

 

Submitting Your Course Syllabus  

 

Each semester or term you teach, you are asked to submit your syllabus to the Off ice of the Divisional Chair and electronically to the Office of Academic Affairs at AcademicSyllabi@mmm.edu. Each student should receive a copy of the course syllabus at the first class, or the latest, by the end of the first week of the semester.   

The syllabus should be considered binding, as written, unless changes are made by the instructor with sufficient notice to the students and to the Divisional Chair.   

See Information for Course Syllabus in Appendix

   

Textbooks and Other Required Books  

 

Posting Textbook Information on the MMC Website 

As students and their parents appreciate the opportunity to shop for the best price in textbooks, faculty are required to post textbook and materials information on the MMC website: www.mmm.edu/bookstore

  The federal government enacted a law within the Higher Education Opportunity Act that requires colleges receiving federal financial assistance to “disclose on the institution’s Internet course schedule and in a manner of the institution’s choosing, the International Standard Book Number [ISBN] and retail price information of required and recommended college textbooks and supplemental materials for each course listed in the institution’s course schedule used for preregistration and registration purposes…”  Exceptions are made (1) if the material has no ISBN number, in which case we are required to list the author, title, publisher, and copyright date, and (2) if presentation of this information is not practicable, in which case we are to indicate “To Be Determined  

To ensure the College’s compliance with federal regulations, please enter the textbook information for your course(s) by no later than the start of the registration period so that students will have this information available to them at registration. If you do not require textbooks for your class, simply choose the “not required” option for the course.   

Created in partnership with  Akademos, Inc., the Online Bookstore simplifies the textbook process for students and professors. Instructions are available on the Online bookstore webpage at  mmm.edu/bookstore

Return to Table of Contents


SECTION VII: COLLEGE RESOURCES AND FACILITIES  

 

College Facilities  

Faculty Lounge 

The Faculty Lounge is a key-access facility designated for faculty use. A networked computer station, a phone, and a writing desk allow faculty members to use the lounge as an alternate workspace. Lamps provide ample light for reading and working. Twelve stackable chairs and other seating accommodate as many as twenty-one people for presentations and readings. Magazine racks for scholarly journals and two large bulletin boards allow faculty to share ideas and postings with each other. A corner cabinet houses a microwave and an electric teakettle for faculty use.   

To receive your access pin code, please email the Associate Director of Campus Safety, Charles Henderson at chenderson@mmm.edu. He will send you your access pin code via email.  

To enter the lounge, enter your 5-digit code in the keypad on the door from the landing of the Regina  Peruggi  Room:  

  1. The lock will display a green light and emit a tone indicating the lock is open.   
  2. You can now open the door; it will re-lock after 3 seconds.   
  3. When you leave the lounge close the door and it will automatically lock.  

If you enter the wrong code 3 times the lock will shut down for approximately 1 minute, and you will not be able to open the door during this time. After 1 minute has elapsed, you will be able to again enter your code.  

Please do not share your personal code with anyone. If you have any questions or problems using this  lock,  please contact the Security Desk x411.   

The Great Hall 

The Great Hall serves as the primary classroom space for the MMC Dance Department. This large ballroom space is equipped with mirrors, portable barres , pianos, a professionally designed wooden floor which is “sprung” to prevent shock injuries to the dancers, and a “marley” covering to provide necessary slip resistance. Because of the limited amount of studio space at the College, a powered, moveable dividing wall was installed to maximize the efficiency and flexibility of Great Hall’s use. Dance department classes are scheduled daily until 7:10pm, and Theatre Production Workshop classes are scheduled at night and on weekends. The Great Hall also serves as a secondary performance venue for the Dance Department where the Dancers at Work showcase is presented twice each year. The Great Hall serves as a location for college-wide events including Orientation and Open House. The maximum capacity of the Great Hall is:  Lecture style: 350, Seated reception: 250.  

Please note:  

  1. Due to the fragile nature of the floor, setup time and clean-up time can be extensive.  
  2. Demand for the space is high and requests are frequently submitted during the semester prior to a proposed event.  

 

The Carl & Marcia Hewitt Gallery of Art  

The Hewitt Gallery of Art, located in the main esplanade and adjacent black and white galleries in the Carson and Nugent Buildings, is a highly recognized showcase gallery that offers both well-known and emerging artists an opportunity for exposure within the art world and the MMC community. Works reflecting a wide range of concerns, styles and media, such as painting, drawing, photography, sculpture, video, and multimedia installations are exhibited on a regular basis throughout the year. The Gallery allows our students the opportunity to engage in an ongoing dialogue with contemporary art and artists, as many of the exhibitors are guest presenters in our art department classes in both studio and art history. Hundreds of artists, critics, collectors, and curators visit the gallery each year, and the visibility of innovative and challenging works of art throughout the College plays an important role in expanding the creative horizons of MMC students. Through internships and curatorial studies, students have the opportunity to participate directly in a professional gallery environment.  For more information please contact Theatre Arts Administrator at x766 or   btiernan@mmm.edu 

Meeting Rooms 

Room  

Location  

Capacity  

President’s Conference Room  

Carson 3rd  floor  

Office of the President  

17  

Multi-Faith Center  

Carson 4th  floor ( CH  412)  

45  

Anne Miller Conference Room  

Nugent-Lower Level  

Center for Student Services  

10-12  

Conference Room  

Faculty Center 2nd  Floor  

255 East 71 st  Street  

10-12  

Multi-Purpose Room  

Faculty Center 2nd  Floor  

255 East 71 st  Street  

20  

Regina  Peruggi  Room  

Carson 2nd  floor  

72  

Café Room  

Carson 4th  floor  

8-10  

The Nugent Lounge 

The Nugent Lounge is located on the first floor of the Nugent Building and is a student lounge.  Student activities and promotional tables for student groups are most appropriate in this space. The space is equipped with computer stations for students who wish to work, as well as with comfortable furniture for relaxation and social exchange.   Starbucks is located inside the Nugent Lounge.  

Residence Halls  

The College houses more than 750 students at the following locations:  

  1. The 55th Street Residence Hall, located on East 55th Street between 2nd and 3rd Avenues, houses primarily first-year students;  
  2. Cooper Square, located on East 6th  Street and Third Avenue, houses primarily continuing students, transfers, and small group of first-year students.      

For more information please contact Kyleen Ammerman, Director of Residence Life at x740 or kammerman@mmm.edu. 

The Regina S. Peruggi Room  

The Mezzanine, named in honor of the College’s sixth President, is located on the second floor of the  Carson building and serves as a  multipurpose space for meeting, events, lectures and receptions. The maximum capacity for this space is 72 (lecture style).  Demand for the space is high and requests are frequently submitted during the semester prior to a proposed event.  

The Theresa Lang Theatre  

The Theresa Lang Theatre affords students training and work experience in a professionally equipped facility, and it serves as a venue for a variety of courses in Theatre and Dance production, stagecraft, design, lighting, scenery, construction, sound, and technical theatre. The Theatre Department presents 4–5 mainstage productions and the Dance Department presents two mainstage productions in the Theatre each year. The productions, which are free to the Marymount Manhattan community, are performed by students in the Fine & Performing Arts Division, and the production crews are made up entirely of students. Students in the Design concentration are regularly invited to design mainstage productions, and students in other concentrations serve as dramaturges, assistant directors, assistant choreographers, and assistant producers. The Theresa Lang Theatre also hosts a variety of college-wide events, including lectures, panel discussions, and Student Affairs-sponsored performances. The capacity is 243  

Please note:  

  1. Seating capacity varies based on the design for the production in process at any given time.  
  2. Demand for the space is high and requests are frequently submitted during the semester prior to a proposed event.  

The Theresa Lang Center for Producing  

The Theresa Lang Center for Producing extends education in the liberal arts into the pre-professional arena, making connections to New York City’s exciting internship experiences, and providing students with the knowledge and skills they need to become creative leaders in the media industries. The Center is comprised of an experimental video studio, digital sound design and graphic design rooms, a suite of non-linear digital video editing rooms and a digital media lab, where students publish their work on a Web server, and broadcast programming over the Internet. Macintosh workstations run a broad array of industry-standard software including, Maya for 3-D design, Pro-Tools for sound design, and Final Cut Pro for video editing. Ancillary equipment includes digital video camcorders and mini-disc recorders.  For more information please contact Sarah Nelson Wright at  swright@mmm.edu    

The Faculty Center 

In July 2013, the College opened the Faculty Center at 255 East 71st Street entrance, to provide office and meeting space for faculty members.  The Faculty Center includes a Conference Room located on the 2nd floor which can accommodate up to 12  people.  There is also a Multi-Purpose Room on the 2nd floor that seats 20 (lecture style)  and is connected to an outdoor terrace. Admissions uses this space for tours during the day, and it is available for other events in the evening. There are small benches along the Terrace perimeter.  The use of glassware, amplified sound and smoking are prohibited on the Faculty Center Terrace.  

The Commons (East & West)  

The Commons is located in the Carson Building on the 3rd floor. The space is best for informal gatherings, receptions and meetings. The max capacity of the room is 140ppl. A closeable partition splits the space approximately in half into The Commons East & West. Banquette seating, bar seating and assorted (2), (4) and (6) top tables and (10) lounge chairs live in the space. The furniture must remain in the space during all events, though the tables and chairs can be removed and/or rearranged to accommodate each event.  Demand for the space is high and requests are frequently submitted during the semester prior to a proposed event.  

The Lowerre Family Terrace 

The Lowerre Family Terrace is accessible through the movable glass doors in The Commons East. The terrace is an outdoor space between the Carson and Nugent Buildings which connects on the 3rd  floor. The max capacity of the terrace is 70ppl. The space boasts a ‘seasonal’ Stone Waterwall, raised platform seating, assorted benches and (4) top tables. Please note – no smoking and no glassware are permitted on the terrace. Amplified sound is permitted with a permit.   

Thomas J. Shanahan Library, Media Center and Archives  

The Thomas J. Shanahan Library offers facilities, resources, and services in support of the instructional and cultural programs of the College. The Library is dedicated to providing information and instruction as a central and integral part of the total educational experience of every student. Its collection of nearly 135,000 books, (of which over 125,000 are eBooks), 5,000 videos and CDs, and over 125 electronic databases (available via remote access) is easily accessible to both students and faculty.

Nowhere is the College’s commitment to new technological learning resources more visible than in the Library. The library system has many advanced features that allow its users to go directly to eBooks and full-text journals. The online catalog and 125 full-text databases are accessible through MMC’s website. All of our databases are configured by an open URL link resolver that enables linking between platforms and can be simultaneously searched using our federated search engine, Quick Search. In addition, our entire e-collection is indexed by Google Scholar.

Over the past few years the library has significantly increased its eBook collection, and now offers over 125,000 eBooks that are directly accessible through  MaMaCat , the library’s online catalog, or Quick Search. Library staff members are available to help with searches, to secure interlibrary loans, and to deliver research documents for free. The Library staff is available to provide individual assistance and instruction in the use of library resources. The Library staff provides formal instruction on library research methods for students in WRIT 102, and other research-related courses. Tours, orientation talks, and specialized lectures and workshops are available upon request.   

The library occupies the second and third floors of the Nugent building and is accessible through two entrances – the main entrance on the second floor and a second entrance on the third floor that connects to the  Lowerre  Family Terrace and Carson Hall. Its main circulation, reserves and reference services are available on the second floor. Also, the second floor houses an extensive reference collection, a large study space, a computerized research area, and the Media Center.  The circulating collection, twenty-six PCs and eight Macs, a printing/copying center, large study areas, and the MMC archives are housed on the third floor.   

The Media Center 

The Media Center houses extensive resources including an audiotape collection, interactive multimedia CD-ROMs, and over 5000 videos and DVDs. It also provides audiovisual hardware including CD and DVD players, LCD players; VHS VCRs; and DVD players.  In addition, the library has a subscription to  Kanopy, a streaming video service that includes over 26,000 films and documentaries.  The Media Center also supports the equipment needs of the Teresa Lange Center for Producing. For more information about the Media Center, please contact Jordan Horsley at 854.  

The Archives 

MMC’s archives occupies space on the upper level of the library near windows overlooking 72nd Street. The archives houses papers, photographs and college publications documenting life at MMC from faculty meetings in 1945 through today. The archive also has five collections pertaining to different aspects of theatrical history. Details about the collections are on the archives’ webpage at: http://www.mmm.edu/offices/library/archives.php, and the archivist, Mary Brown, is available at mbrown1@mmm.edu and at (212) 774-4817. Please contact her if you think the archives might provide material for your own research or for a class assignment.  

Brightspace 

MMC adopted Brightspace as its online learning platform in 2022.  Each semester an online course shell is created for each course. The degree of technology used in the delivery of each course varies from “web-enhanced courses” which might post supplementary readings online to “blended” courses which have online discussions in place of some face-to-face meetings, to courses delivered completely “online.” Training on Brightspace is available for faculty.  For more information about Brightspace, visit the Brightspace Faculty Resource page or contact Deanna Sessions Milano(opens in a new tab), Instructional and Adaptive Technologist at dmilano@mmm.edu

Campus Resources  

Student Success Advisement 

Department Page:  http://www.mmm.edu/offices/academic-advisement/index.php  

The Office of Student Success Advisement is responsible for the effective coordination and management of the college’s advisement services and programs. Its primary goal is that of assisting students in making informed academic choices and providing them with the individual guidance they may need to complete their academic course of study in a successful and timely fashion. By providing students with critical information regarding their majors, minors, elective courses, career options, as well as co-curricular activities, the advisement process allows students to make the best of their college experience. Working collaboratively with the various academic divisions,  the Office encourages students to meet regularly with their designated faculty advisors and to benefit from the expert guidance of someone within their selected area of study. In addition, through its Academic Alert program, the office is particularly geared to provide appropriate intervention and support for those students who may be academically at-risk and in need of careful and timely academic counseling. In so doing, the office is particularly instrumental in helping students overcome both personal and academic  barriers and  assisting them in the pursuit of their academic objectives.  For more information please contact the Office at  212-517-0568.  

The Center for Academic Support and Tutoring 

Department Page:  www.mmm.edu/cast  

The Center for Academic Support and Tutoring (CAST) has two primary functions - providing tutoring for all Marymount Manhattan students and offering placement tests for incoming students. The Center prides itself on providing one-on-one support for every student. It is the mission of the Center to provide these services in any reasonable manner in order to secure student futures; its main objective is to assure each student who passes through the doors that they can and will succeed in college. For more information about the Center for Academic Support and Tutoring, please call 212-774-4820.  

Higher Education Opportunity Program (HEOP)  

Department Page: https://www.mmm.edu/academics/higher-education-opportunity-program.php 

The Higher Education Opportunity Program (HEOP) has been offered at MMC since 1969. This program developed out of the need for private colleges and universities in New York State to provide higher education for students who have academic potential but lack the necessary academic preparation and demonstrate financial need. The HEOP program receives funding from the New York State Higher Education Opportunity Grant which is supplemented by MMC funding. Students in HEOP receive support services that include: developmental courses, tutorial work and counseling (academic, personal, and career planning). Students entering the College through this program are required to participate in the developmental six-week summer program. For more information please contact the Office at 212-517-0590.  

Academic Access Program

353E Nugent Hall
The Academic Access Program is a cost-above tuition program that is specifically designed to foster academic success for students with documented learning disabilities. Through multifaceted academic support, students with learning-style differences will have the opportunity to manage the MMC curriculum along with their peers and classmates. The program provides participating students with tutoring services, counseling, advisement, and priority registration. For more information, contact Academic Access Coordinator Diana Nash at dnash@mmm.edu or (212) 774-0724.

Office of Disability Services

353 Nugent Hall
https://www.mmm.edu/offices/disability-services/

In compliance with Section 504 of the Federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Office of Disability Services provides academic and housing accommodations to students with documented learning, physical, and/or psychological disabilities. Students who wish to pursue accommodations must contact the Office of Disability Services to submit their request before the start of the semester or after a qualifying event. To ensure that the academic accommodation process is complete when classes begin, students are encouraged to submit their request no later than August 1 for the fall semester and no later than January 1 for the spring semester.

It is solely the student’s responsibility to contact the Office of Disability Services to self-identify as having a need for accommodation. When a student is approved for academic accommodations and grants permission for our office to share accommodation information, the Office of Disability Services sends a letter to the student’s professors via confidential email with descriptions of approved accommodations. Accommodation letters typically arrive on the first day of a semester, after the add period has ended, or, in the case of a mid-semester request, when the accommodation process is complete. The Office of Disability Services does not disclose the nature or type of disability and faculty may not ask students to share this information.

Students or professors with questions regarding the Office of Disability Services or accommodations should contact Lauren Kilian, Director of Disability Services at lkilian@mmm.edu or (212) 774-0719.

 

NOTE: In compliance with Section 504 of the Federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act, students with disabilities, whether they be physical, psychological, or learning disabilities, are eligible to request accommodations. The student must be registered with the Office of Disability Services and/or the Academic Access Program.

 

Office of Career Services  

106 Carson Hall
212-517-0599
careerservices@mmm.edu
https://www.mmm.edu/offices/career-services/


Marymount Manhattan’s Office of Career Services assists students and recent alumni with their professional development by providing a wide-ranging series of career programming, individual career counseling, and access to job and internship postings. Career exploration, resume and cover letter review, interviewing techniques, networking in-person and online, job search strategies, and identifying transferable skills are just a sample of the topics offered by the Career Services’ staff. These resources are intended to enhance career development and marketability for both students and recent alumni. Emphasis is placed on relating studies, interests and goals while developing a solid career strategy. A developmental approach to career counseling is favored at MMC, with a four-year interactive, online course called CareerLab through which MMC introduces students to foundational concepts in career and professional development and planning. CareerLab is a self-guided, on-line series of “labs” that teach students how to understand their strengths and talents in a professional capacity, use the right vocabulary to promote themselves during job interviews, create an appropriate and professional social media presence, participate in mock interviews and learn how and where to search for job opportunities. 

Many job listings are available online through the MMC Career Connection job portal, accessed through Marymount Manhattan’s Career Services webpage. The Office develops and maintains relationships with employers locally and nationwide. Many offerings are tailored specifically for Marymount students. Career fairs, site visits with employers, networking events, and on campus recruitment are some of the ways that the Office connects students with employers. An annual Professional Development Summit connects students with outside professionals who offer individual and group career counseling, insights into employer expectations and ways to maximize a student’s Marymount education and career experiences they’ve already had. Career Services also assists students with graduate and professional school application advisement.

 

Internships

Completing an internship during undergraduate education is a great way for students to apply what they have learned in their classes to a real-world setting. It is also an opportunity for them to begin building a network with professionals and explore options for employment after college. Internships have been cited as the number one way for companies/organizations to recruit college graduates. They are also an outstanding career counseling tool and can help students figure out what they want to do and as well what they do not want to do post-college. Students who successfully complete internships are better positioned to find permanent employment in this challenging job market. Internships are a great way to build a resume and develop the necessary skills for professional achievement after college. The College has two academic internship programs: Off-Campus Internships and On-Campus Internships. The College also offers CityEdge Internships Stipends to students completing unpaid internship which meet certain requirements.

 

Off-Campus Internships

Marymount Manhattan’s Off-Campus Internship Program allows students to earn academic credit for their internship at an external company or organization. Students can apply to receive credit for their external internships during the Fall, January, Spring, and Summer semesters. Students may also do internships without receiving credit and Career Services will help students to prepare for those opportunities as well.

 

Requirements:

  1. Have completed a minimum of 24 credits at MMC (or 12 MMC credits for transfer students).
  2. Possess a GPA of 2.0 or above.
  3. Have completed the For-Credit Internship Learning Agreement. This document must be completed by the student and the internship site supervisor before completing the online application. A completed digital copy must be uploaded to the online application.
  4. Find a full time faculty member at the college to supervise and approve their internship. Faculty will supervise students during their internships and provide them with assignments for this graded course. Students must meet with their faculty member and develop a syllabus prior to submitting an application to receive credit.
  5. Have completed the CareerLab assignment “Draft Your Informational Interview Questions” located in MMC Engage. Students only need to complete this assignment for their first for-credit internship, not each time they complete an internship for-credit.

Once these requirements have been met, the student must complete the Online Application to Receive Credit for an Internship, available on the Internships Page of the website.

 

On-Campus Internships

On-Campus Internships provide educational and experiential opportunities for students to receive hands-on, pre-professional experiences supporting a variety of projects and initiatives in both academic and non-academic divisions and departments across the College. These 1-credit internships provide a valuable tool for students early in their academic careers to build both technical and interpersonal skills in order to prepare them to pursue external internships and job opportunities both during and after college. In addition to learning valuable skillsets from across the range of professional work done within a higher education context, these on-campus internships allow students to make an impact on the College community and to find their unique place at MMC.

On-Campus Internships are completed for 1 credit during the fall or spring semester, and are typically supervised by the Office of Career Services. Coursework is comprised of relevant assignments and activities from CareerLab. No more than a total of 3 credits may be earned through on-campus internship throughout the student’s years at the College. These credits do not fulfill major, minor, or general education requirements. They also do not limit the number of credits students can earn for off-campus internships.

 

Eligibility Requirements:

  1. Prior to the start of the internship, the student must have earned a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or above;
  2. Prior to the start of the internship, the student must have earned a total of 12 credits at MMC, either by successfully completing MMC classes or receiving credits in transfer prior to matriculating at MMC;
  3. Prior to the start of the internship, the student must complete the Internship-for-Credit assignment in CareerLab.

 

On-Campus Internship Course

On-Campus Internships are taken Pass/Fail for 1-credit during the Fall or Spring Semester. In order to earn the 1 credit, students will be enrolled into an online course, normally supervised by Career Services. This online course has four assignments that students must complete:

Weekly Reflection Assignment
Digital Mock Interview Assignment
Informational Interview with a Staff Member
Final Reflection Paper or Video

Completion of these assignments combined with the Site Supervisor Evaluation of the student’s performance will determine the grade of the On-Campus Internship.

For more information about the Internship Programs offered at Marymount Manhattan, and to see a detailed outline of the process to receive credit, please visit the Internships Page of the website. https://www.mmm.edu/offices/career-services/student-internships.php

 

CityEdge Internship Stipends

CityEdge Internship Stipends provide funding to students completing unpaid internships that meet certain qualifications. These stipends help to off-set the cost of completing an unpaid internship, so that a student does not have to make the choice between completing a professional development opportunity or having a paying job.

 

CityEdge Internship Stipend Guidelines

1. Only unpaid internships are eligible.

The CityEdge Internship Stipend is open to all students completing an unpaid internship at a non-profit or government organization

The CityEdge Internship Stipend is open to underrepresented students completing unpaid internships at for-profit organizations (this includes students who identify as members of the BIPOC Community, LGBTQIA+ Community, First Generation Students, students in the HEOP Program, and students with financial need as determined by the FAFSA).

2. Internships may be taken for-credit or not for-credit.

3. Internship duration must be equivalent to at least the duration of the semester. Students completing non-credit internships must begin their internships no later than one week after the start of the semester.

4. Selection is competitive and will based upon financial need as determined by the Financial Aid Office and quality of your application.

5. Students will be required to complete a reflection essay (500 - 750 words) summarizing their internship experience or submit a 2 minute video reflection of their experience at the end of the semester to receive final stipend installment.

6. Students may reapply for the stipend in the future if not chosen in a given semester. There is no limit to the number of times students can apply!

7. Students must complete the stipend application by the last day of Add/Drop each semester.

For more information, please visit the CityEdge Internship Stipend page of the website. https://www.mmm.edu/offices/career-services/cityedge-internship-stipend/

 

Other Services

Career Services also offers workshops for classroom visits and events. Workshops include but are not limited to: General Overview of Career Services, Resume Building, Cover Letter Creation, Getting LinkedIn, Managing Your Digital Profiles, Interview Skills, Marketing and Networking, Email Etiquette, Communicating With Employers and Women and Negotiating Your Salary. Career Services is also happy to work with the Faculty to develop more specific or new programming. Faculty members can request a workshop through our online form or by emailing careerservices@mmm.edu .

 

The Center for Student Services 

Departmental Page:   https://www.mmm.edu/offices/center-for-student-services/index.php  

 The Center for Student Services (CSS) welcomes all visitors and provides students and their families with a one-stop experience to discuss their financial and registration questions.  The Center for Student Services includes the offices of Financial Aid, Student Accounts, Registration/Records and International Student Services. The Center staff work closely with Admissions, Academic Advisement and Residence Life to enroll and retain our new and continuing students.  The CSS staff is available in person, by phone or by email to discuss and answer questions.  

The Registrar works closely with faculty and responds to questions about FERPA, grades, EDNAR attendance, course substitutions and student registration, etc. Financial Aid is available to respond to questions about filing for aid, completing the proper forms, filling out loan applications and questions from faculty about students with financial difficulties.  Student Accounts is available to discuss the student’s bill, meal plan amounts, setting up a payment plan and other billing questions.   

You can reach us at:  

Phone: 212 517-0500  
Email:  ISS@mmm.edu 
Registrar:  css@mmm.edu  
Financial Aid:  financialaid@mmm.edu  
Student Accts:  studentaccounts@mmm.edu  

 

International Student Office  

Department Page:   https://www.mmm.edu/offices/center-for-student-services/international-students/admitted-students/  

 MMC welcomes students from various countries around the world and has a growing international population on campus.  The International Student Services Office located in the Center for Student Services serves as a resource for international students and facilitates their adjustment to life in the United States. 

Many international students come over to the United States with F-1 Student visas.  The ISS office works to assist the F-1 students in following the rules and regulations while maintaining their F-1 student status. Students must attend the International Student orientation.  F-1 students must maintain a full course of study (minimum of 12 credits)  each semester.  Students must receive authorization from the Principle Designated School Official (PDSO/Assistant Director of International Student Services) if they need to study part-time for specific reasons.  Students must attend all their classes and not exceed the amount of absences dictated by the individual professor.  F-1 students who are maintaining their status may work on-campus, provided they get clearance from the Assistant Director of International Student Services. All F-1 students must get their I-20 signed by a Principle Designated School Official (PDSO)/ Designated School Official (DSO) when traveling outside the country.  In addition, all international students must participate in the College’s health insurance plan.  For more information, contact the International Student Services Office at 212-517-0501.  

 

Health Services - Dow Zanghi Student Health Center 

Department Page:    https://www.mmm.edu/offices/dow-zanghi-health-center/index.php  

 The Dow  Zanghi  Student Health Center is committed to providing quality health care to all students. The health center offers free primary care, including treatment for colds, flu and minor injuries, physicals, STI/HIV testing and women’s health care services. Some tests and vaccinations are subject to fees; which students can submit to their health insurance provider for reimbursement. The services are provided by Mt. Sinai/Beth Israel, Student Health Services Network.  

Hours  

During fall and spring semester:  Monday, Tuesday and Thursdays from 10 am to 6 pm.

 Appointments and Walk-Ins  

Students can call the Dow  Zanghi  Student Health Center at 212-759-5870 to schedule an appointment or just walk in.  

 After Hours  

Through the Center, students have access to a 24/7 on-call Mt. Sinai/Beth Israel triage doctor for urgent care. The doctor can be reached by calling 212-420-2882.    

Location, Phone, Email  

The Dow  Zanghi  Student Health Center is located in the 55th Street Residence Hall, first floor. The phone number is 212-759-5870. The email address is  healthcenter@mmm.edu.  

 

Counseling and Wellness Center  

212-774-0700
Nugent Hall 352

Department Page:  http://www.mmm.edu/offices/counseling-and-wellness-center/  

The Counseling and Wellness Center (CWC) promotes students’ development and well-being and treats their personal and psychological problems. The CWC offers short-term individual counseling (both in-person and telemental health), psychiatric evaluations for prescription medications, outreach programming, and referrals for care in the community.  

CWC helps students deal with a range of difficulties, including, but not limited to, stress, homesickness, loneliness, anxiety, depression, self-esteem, eating and body image, relationships, academic struggles, sexual and sexual identity concerns, sexual assault, and alcohol or drugs issues. The staff is made up of a clinical psychologist, a clinical social worker, a medication provider, and advanced doctoral psychology trainees. All are dedicated to helping students. 

CWC also oversees the Student Health Insurance Plan and immunization records.  

Hours 

During fall and spring semesters:  Monday-Friday 9am-5pm  

Drop-in Hours:  Monday –Friday  2pm-4pm  

Appointments  

To schedule an appointment, students can call 212-774-0700 or email counseling@mmm.edu. Prior to arranging the first visit, a CWC counselor will briefly speak to the student. All services are free of charge and confidential. CWC does not have a waiting list and we try to see each student within a week of first contact.  

After Hours  

If a crisis emerges after hours and you need immediate assistance, please call Campus Security at 212-517-0411, go to the nearest emergency room or dial 911.  

For after-hours support, students can reach these 24/7 hotlines:

  • NYC Well:  888-692-9355 or text WELL to 65173 (trained professionals will provide immediate guidance and emotional support)
  • Crisis Text Line: Text HOME to 741741 (help for anyone in crisis)
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 800-273-8255

 

Human Resources 

Department Page:     https://www.mmm.edu/offices/human-resources/  

 The Office of Human Resources manages employment opportunities and processes for the College and administers employee benefits and other programs. The Office is also responsible for ensuring the College is a healthy, safe and encouraging workplace for all faculty and staff members. 

Contact Information:  

  • Bree Bullingham, Assistant Vice President for Human Resources, ext. 532  
  • Kevin Ng, Director of HRIS/Benefits Manager, ext. 539

 

Study Abroad 

Department Page:  https://www.mmm.edu/offices/study-abroad/  

 Study abroad is an intellectually stimulating and life-changing experience. Students who incorporate overseas study into their academic careers deepen their knowledge of international, political and cultural affairs. We suggest that students start planning to study abroad at least a year in advance.  

Faculty advisors perform a crucial role in advisement and review of the course of study that the students propose to take on study abroad. The faculty advisor may be asked to provide a written recommendation that attests to the likelihood that a student will succeed in his/her study abroad program. It is preferable that students go abroad in their sophomore or junior year so they will have time to return to MMC and prepare for graduation, but this is not a definite rule.  

Scholarships for study abroad include the following:  

  • Edgar and Lucky Eisner have established the Edgar and Lucky Eisner Endowed Scholarship for an MMC student to participate in a summer study abroad program in Europe or Asia. The scholarship is intended to foster the study of economic issues.  
  • In honor and recognition of Judith  Savard, R SHM, MMC awards the Sr. Judith  Savard Fellowship to art or art history majors to study art abroad.  
  • The Institute of International Education administers two national, competitive scholarship programs; The Boren Scholarship and the Gilman International Scholarship.  
  • The Boren Scholarship is for students to study less commonly taught languages in world regions critical to U.S. interests but underrepresented in study abroad.  
  • The Gilman International Scholarship is for students of limited financial means (Federal Pell Grant recipients) to participate in a study abroad program or internship for credit.  
  • Students must be U.S. citizens to apply for the Boren and Gilman scholarships.  

For more information please contact Tseday Alehegn at talehegn@mmm.edu

 

The Ruth Smadbeck Communication and Learning Center 

Department Page:   https://www.mmm.edu/admissions/brookdale-ba-speech-language-pathology-and-audiology-2.php  

The Ruth Smadbeck Communication and Learning Center provides speech and language diagnostic and treatment services and audiological diagnostic services to the Marymount Manhattan community and to people living in the New York Metropolitan area. The Center serves as a training clinic for students majoring in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology.   

Speech therapy is available free of charge for both children and adults under the supervision of the clinic director, the clinical staff, and members of the CSD faculty, all certified, licensed speech-language pathologists or audiologists.  Language and speech disorders ranging from articulation, voice, disfluency, language delay, and other conditions affecting communication are treated.   

The Center’s Speech Science laboratory is utilized to conduct research, education, and deliver training modules. In addition, voice and speech analysis are conducted to assess the needs of the Center’s clients.  The Center has a second lab that serves the educational purposes of training students to conduct research under the sponsorship of the department faculty, who have active research programs in linguistics, psycholinguistics, and neurolinguistics.  

The facilities contain therapy rooms equipped with a state-of-the-art closed circuit audio/visual system to maximize teaching and learning opportunities. The Center has soundproof rooms that house the Audiology and Speech Science Labs. The Center is located on the seventh floor of  Carson Hall in the Departments of Communication Sciences and Disorders. For more information about the Smadbeck Center please contact Denise Cruz at x728  or x728.  

 

Technology 

 

Colleague  

Our administrative software system is an Ellucian product called “Colleague.” The current user interface is a web-based platform referred to as “webui” accessible using a web browser with the URL: http://webui.mmm.edu.  Faculty use webui in advising students and recording their approval of the student’s registration   via an HBA code. Faculty can also use webui.mmm.edu to check on a student’s major. Training is available for new faculty from the Office of Academic Advisement at Lower Level of Nugent,  212 -517-0568,  advisement@mmm.edu.  

MMC Connect  

MMC Connect is a user-friendly interface to Colleague for students and faculty. Faculty are given access to MMC Connect via their network account and password. Through MMC Connect, faculty can access their class rosters, academic alerts, cancel classes, EDNAR,  submit textbooks, emailing advisor/advisees student profiles, student transcripts, program evaluations and grades submission. You may also use MMC Connect to enter an HBA clearance flag to enable students to register.  

MMC Portal  

The portal is a one-stop shop for all your daily network applications, such as Colleague, MMC Connect,  Turnitin Schooldude Ednar, Cancel a Class Session and more. The portal can be accessed from anywhere by using your browser and entering the URL: https://portal.mmm.edu or via  Quicklinks on the MMC Homepage.  

Technology-Enhanced Rooms  

TECs are equipped with an instructor workstation, mounted LCD or a mounted projector, and Internet access. The instructor workstation has the capability to work with a MAC as well (a display adapter may be required). For the following rooms, you will need to bring an adapter for an HDMI connection. Instructions for using the technology in these rooms can be accessed via the IT website at   https://www.mmm.edu/offices/information-technology/room-specific-tech-guides/   or by scanning the QR Code on the Podium on each room.  

TECs include:     

Carson Hall: 200, 503, 504, 505, 509, 510, 610, 612, 700, 701, and 703

Nugent Hall: 458, 462, 553, 557, and 561

 

Workstation equipped classrooms (WECs) are equipped with an instructor workstation with a PC or Mac, a mounted LCD, and Internet access.  

WECs include:   

Building/Room  

Type  

Carson  410  

(18 PC workstations)  

Carson  411  

(22 PC workstations)  

Nugent 556  

(12 Mac workstations)  

Nugent 559  

(12 Mac workstations)  

Nugent 558  

(Digital Media Production Studio 1 MAC workstation)  

Nugent 554  

(16 Mac Workstations)  

Nugent 250D  

(MAC Lab WEC)  

The College recommends that all faculty members using the equipment in the TECs be required to have training by visiting the IT Website and reviewing the video tutorial(s) for your classrooms  https://www.mmm.edu/offices/information-technology/room-specific-tech-guides/     

Support  

Support for the TECs or the WECs with PCs is available 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m., Monday-Friday.   Call 212 517-0580 for the IT Help Desk.   

Support for the TECs and WECs with Macs is available at 212-517-0595 or 212-774-4829 from 8:00 am – 8:00 pm. Telephones in the classrooms directly connect to the Office of Information Technology for additional support.  

Classroom Equipment Tutorials  

The IT Website at  www.mmm.edu/it  provides video tutorials on the use of equipment in your classroom.   

Software Tutorials  

Instructional videos on the use of Microsoft Office, Adobe Products and Brightspace are available on the IT website at  www.mmm.edu/it.  

 

Technology in the Library  

The Thomas J. Shanahan Library offers Windows and MAC OS-based workstations, research computers, and laptops for loan to students. The laptops can be used throughout the Nugent and Carson buildings. In addition, an editing lab RM 250D the Jade Room is also located in the library, and is equipped with Mac workstations that are fully loaded with design and digital production software.  

Return to Table of Contents


SECTION VIII. COLLEGE POLICIES  

 

Link to Staff Handbook:   https://www.mmm.edu/offices/human-resources/staff-handbook.php  

The majority of policies included in this section are also included in the MMC  Staff Handbook , which is distributed at the time of hire and available online at the link above.   

The Marymount Manhattan College Faculty Handbook is intended solely as a guide. Nothing in the Handbook is intended or should be construed to create contractually enforceable obligations on the part of the College or rights on behalf of the employee.  
 
The Handbook is a compilation and condensation of governing language with respect to employee benefits, policies and procedures. In the event that any statement of an employee benefit, policy and/or procedure found in this Handbook is inconsistent or contrary to the language or intent of the governing employee benefit, policy and/or procedure, the governing document takes precedence. This includes, but is not limited to, grammatical and/or formatting errors that may unintentionally alter the meaning of the stated employee benefits, policies and procedures in the Handbook.  
 
If any information contained in this Manual is in conflict with individual employment contracts, any applicable collective bargaining agreements or information contained in official Company bulletins, the information in those documents will govern. 
 
The College reserves the right to add, amend, or revoke any of the employee benefits, policies and procedures or incorporate additional ones, with or without notice, as circumstance or the good of the college community may require.  
 
Employees should consult with Human Resources for further details and/or clarification on current employee benefits, policies and procedures. 

 

Conflicts of Interest for Faculty and Staff

(Approved by Academic Policy Committee on April 18, 2012)  

Federal regulations require that institutions applying for federal grant funds have a Conflicts of Interest policy that meets certain requirements.  These regulations seek : “ to promote objectivity in research by establishing standards to ensure there is no reasonable expectation that the design, conduct or reporting of research funded under PHS grants or cooperative agreements will be biased by any conflicting financial interest of an investigator.”  In conformance with these regulations, Marymount Manhattan College has established this policy.  

Faculty and staff have an obligation to conduct their college responsibilities within guidelines that prohibit actual or potential conflicts of interest and that maintain the highest standards of integrity.     

Accordingly, no faculty or staff shall have any interest, financial or otherwise, direct or indirect, or engage in any business or transaction or professional activity, or incur any obligation of any nature, which is in substantial conflict with the proper discharge of his or her duties and responsibilities at the  College or from which s/he could benefit financially.   

In order to comply fully with the federal regulations, MMC is required to offer training, which is mandatory for faculty and staff involved in or applying for federally-funded research grants.  This training must occur prior to beginning work on any federally-funded research and must be repeated at least every four years  

Integrity in research requires that all aspects of research be free from bias originating from any real or potential conflict of interest.  Conflicts of interest are not, in and of themselves, unallowable; however, they must be disclosed and managed in conformance with college policy and federal regulations.     

In order to limit any financial conflicts that may affect research and/or result in bias, and in compliance with federal regulations, Marymount Manhattan College requires disclosure of significant financial interests.  Faculty who wish to apply for research or educational funding to any federal granting agency, or any faculty participating in federally funded projects, must submit a financial disclosure listing any and all significant financial interests (SFI) of her/himself, his/her spouse or dependent children if:  

  • The value of said financial interest is $5,000 or more;  
  • The financial interest represents any equity, regardless of the value, in a non-public entity;  
  • It could reasonably appear that the financial interest might affect the activity for which funding is being sought; or   
  • If the research or educational activity might appear to affect the financial interests.  

The disclosure must cover the previous 12 months and it must be filed prior to the submission of any federal grant application. If there is a change or if any new significant financial interest is acquired, the disclosure must be updated within 30 days.  If a multi-year federal grant is involved, the faculty member/Principal Investigator must disclose any significant financial interest at the time of the annual report to the granting agency.  

If the grant applicant or faculty participating in the grant project has no significant financial interests to disclose, s/he must so certify.  

An MMC faculty member might have, or appear to have, a conflict of interest if s/he is engaged in any of the following situations:  

  • Failing to disclose a significant financial interest, either his/her own or that of a spouse or dependent children, which could affect the performance of official duties, including teaching and scholarship, or which could affect one’s judgment in the conduct of official duties, including research and scholarship.  
  • Engaging in outside employment which may affect or impair her/his judgment in the conduct of research or other official duties.  
  • Disclosing confidential information obtained in the course of official duties, except as required by law.  
  • Conducting college business with any entity in which the faculty member or a relative has a financial interest.    
  • Accepting gifts intended to, or giving the appearance of attempting to, influence the conduct of your official duties.  
  • Using or attempting to use his/her official status at MMC for personal gain or privilege.  
  • Hiring or engaging in decisions about hiring, promoting, disciplining, discharging or supervising any employee who is a member of his/her family or a close personal friend.    

 

Some things to consider:    

  • Financial conflicts of interest may occur when an individual is in a position to influence college business dealings so as to produce personal gain for that individual, or for a relative, friend, or business associate.     
  • The increasing involvement of academic researchers and educators with industry and private entrepreneurial ventures can lead to an increased risk of conflict of interests.    
  • A financial conflict could exist if a faculty member receives a research grant that requires purchasing an expensive piece of equipment and then attempts to buy that equipment from a relative’s business.     

The VPAA/Dean has appointed Dr. Laura Tropp, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, as the Conflicts of Interest Officer.   In this capacity, Dean Tropp is responsible for: 

  • Informing faculty and staff about the provisions of this policy, including the need to disclose significant financial interests prior to any federal grant submission.  
  • Receiving any submitted financial disclosures and reviewing them for possible conflicts.  
  • Consulting with the VPAA/Dean and any other appropriate officials to determine if there is a financial conflict of interest;  
  • Deciding what conditions, if any, are required to resolve any conflicts.    
  • Overseeing compliance with College policy in regard to FCOIs.  
  • Maintaining the confidentiality of any information disclosed, except as needed to resolve conflicts, or as required by any legitimate regulation or by law.  

In some cases, projects with financial conflicts can be carried out with conditions or restrictions determined by the Conflicts of Interest Officer.  Such conditions could include:  

  • Full and public disclosure of the financial interests.  
  • Divestiture of the financial interests;  
  • Modification or monitoring of the research;  
  • Recusal of the investigator from certain sections of the research;  
  • Severance of relations that cause or appear to cause conflicts of interest.  
  • Other conditions deemed by the Conflicts of Interest Officer to be appropriate.  

Faculty or staff found to be in violation of this policy may be subject to sanctions such:  

  • Having a letter of censure placed in the file;   
  • Being deemed ineligible to submit grant or IRB applications;   
  • Being prohibited from teaching or research;   
  • In egregious cases, not being reappointed or being dismissed.   

As required by federal regulations, the College will report to the NIH and/or to the appropriate federal authorities, granting agency, or other relevant entity about any conflicts of interest and how they are being managed at the College.   

 

Guidelines for Approval of Published Materials  

(Office of Institutional Advancement, 2005)  

All written correspondences, including invitations, flyers, departmental newsletters, catalogs, handbooks, and press releases, should follow the visual guidelines provided in the MMC Style Guide, which can be found on the P Drive in the “MMC Brand” file.  

 

Parental/Caregiver Leave Policy

(Approved by APC 01/2015)

The Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA) provides for the granting of 12 weeks of unpaid leave to an employee under the following circumstances and after one full year of employment at the place of business:

  1. Upon the birth, placement for adoption or foster care of a child;
  2. When he/she is needed to care for a child, spouse or parent with a serious condition; and
  3. When the employee has a serious health condition that makes him/her unable to perform the functions of his/her job.

Following FMLA guidelines, an employee will be eligible for FMLA leave after 12 months of employment. Parental leave (paternity or maternity) is considered leave under the FMLA.

In order to ease the economic circumstances of those requiring leave to care for newly born, adopted or foster care placed child, or to provide care to a child, spouse or partner, or parent with a serious health condition, the College will provide paid leave to full-time faculty members under certain circumstances to those requiring these types of FMLA qualifying leave (pay during the serious health condition of the faculty member him/herself is addressed elsewhere). Faculty members are entitled to only one such paid leave per twelve months (even if less than twelve weeks are utilized during said paid leave).

Parental/caregiver leave: MMC will provide up to 8 weeks of paid leave and 8 weeks of unpaid leave to a faculty member:

  • who is adopting a child or is receiving a foster care placement
  • whose spouse or partner is giving birth, adopting, or is receiving foster care placement
  • who is needed to care for a child, parent, spouse, or partner with a serious medical condition (medical certification and certification that the faculty member is the primary caregiver is required according to FMLA guidelines)

The faculty member has the right to select a full semester of 16 weeks at half-pay in lieu of the eight weeks paid leave/eight weeks unpaid leave.

A faculty member may, of course, opt for only the paid leave. In addition, a faculty member can request to teach part-time and receive a semester of 16 weeks and full pay. They will be required to teach 2 courses in that semester, of a 4-course load, and receive a 2-course release in that same semester. Approval of this option is at the sole discretion of the Division Chair and Academic Dean. If leave is taken during the 3-course semester, the faculty member must teach 1 course and participate in 1 project and/or administrative assignment as assigned by his/her Division Chair and approved by the Academic Dean.

Alternative arrangements may be made if requested by the faculty member and at the sole discretion of the Division Chair, Academic Dean and Human Resources.

All parental leaves must be taken within 12 months of the birth, adoption or placement (FMLA guidelines).

Faculty members on year-to-year contracts may not be granted leave beyond the end dates of their appointments unless the renewal of their contract is established (AAUP guidelines).

At the faculty member’s request, a tenure clock will be suspended for up to one year if an FMLA leave is granted (AAUP Guidelines).

Current Procedure

A faculty member desiring a leave for reasons of health or personal need shall apply in writing to the Academic Dean as soon as it is possible to do so. If the leave request is for medical reasons, Human Resources must be notified as well. After consultation with the Department Chair, the Dean shall transmit the application together with a written recommendation to the President, who shall proceed as with other applications for leave. (MMC Governance Section 3.02.01.).

The normal teaching duties of the faculty member may be reassigned through 1) a colleague assuming an overload, 2) the hiring of adjunct faculty, or 3) the hiring of a full-time faculty member for the duration of the leave. The Chair of the department in consultation with the full department faculty will assess the best course of action and submit the recommendation to the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

In the case that a request for leave has a mid-semester start or end date, the Chair, faculty member and Vice President for Academic Affairs will work out how teaching duties should be covered. In some instances, a faculty member may request a reduced teaching load as part of the arrangement.

While on unpaid FMLA leave, employees will be responsible for paying 100% of their share of medical and dental premiums. While on unpaid leave, MMC will not make contributions to TIAA-CREF.

 

Paid Family Leave

Effective January 1, 2018, New York State has adopted a Paid Family Leave (NY PFL) law.

Leave reasons

The NY PFL law provides partially paid job-protected leave for the following reasons:

  • To bond with a newborn, newly adopted, or newly placed foster child (within one year of birth, adoption, or placement)
  • To care for a covered family member with a serious health condition
  • To address exigencies if a covered family member is called to active military duty (“military exigency”)

Employee eligibility

Both full-time and part-time employees whose primary work location is in New York are eligible for NY PFL. Employees who work 20 or more hours per week are eligible for coverage after 26 weeks of consecutive employment.

Employees who work fewer than 20 hours per week are eligible after 175 days of employment (which need not be consecutive).

Amount and length of NY PFL benefit

The NY PFL law benefit for 2022 is 67% of your average weekly wage, not to exceed 67% of the 2022 New York State average weekly wage of $1,594.57. The maximum weekly payout is $1,068.36 for twelve weeks.

Under the NY PFL law, if an employee is out on a leave that carries over into the next calendar year, the benefit that was in effect when the leave began will remain applicable. For example, if an employee commences a leave in 2022, the 2022 benefit amounts will continue to apply if the leave carries over into 2023.

For 2022, employees may take NY PFL on or after January 1, 2022, to bond with a newborn or newly adopted or placed child as long as the birth, adoption, or placement occurred (“qualifying event”) fewer than 52 weeks prior to the commencement of the leave and the leave is completed prior to the expiration of 52 weeks after the qualifying event.

Employee funding of NY PFL

The NY PFL benefit is funded exclusively through employee payroll deduction. For 2022, the amount of the employee payroll deduction is 0.511% of your average weekly wages, not to exceed the statewide average weekly wage. The State has indicated that the current average weekly wage is $1,594.57. This cap means that while your actual contribution is dependent upon your wages, it will not exceed $423.71 for all of 2022.

Health insurance benefits

Under the NY PFL law, employees are entitled to continue their group health insurance benefits during their covered leave. Employees will be responsible for continuing to pay their share of insurance premiums during this period.

Relationship to FMLA and NY statutory disability benefits

If you are eligible for leave under the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), your NY PFL leave may run concurrently with your FMLA leave. You also may be eligible for New York Statutory Disability Benefits (NY DBL), which provide a benefit if you miss work for your own disabling medical condition. (It’s important to know that you may not take NY PFL and NY DBL leave at the same time). NY DBL provides for up to 26 weeks of disability benefits per year. While an employee is also eligible for eight weeks of NY PFL for 2022, the law requires that the maximum amount of NY DBL and NY PFL taken in a 52-consecutive-week period cannot exceed 26 weeks.

Therefore, if you take eight weeks of NY PFL, you will only have 18 weeks of NY DBL available for that 52-week period.

Process for taking NY PFL

Employees will be required to submit a request for NY PFL containing information prescribed by the State of New York. Employees will also be required to submit a certification (again, in a format being prepared by the State of New York) to support the need for the leave.

  • For bonding leave, employees will need to provide verification of the date of the child’s birth, adoption, or
  • For leave to care for a family member with a serious health condition, employees will be required to submit a medical certification from the family member’s health care
  • For military exigency leave, an employee will need to submit a copy of the family member’s military documentation and possibly other documentation relating to the specific reason for the

Intermittent NY PFL leave

The NY PFL law permits employees to take intermittent NY PFL in increments of no less than one work day. If you work any part of a day, you are not eligible for NY PFL benefits for that day.

Notice requirements

Under the NY PFL law, for leaves that can be anticipated, employees must give employers at least 30 days’ advance notice. Employees may “pre-file” for NY PFL before a qualifying event has occurred. If the need for the leave cannot be anticipated, employees must give notice as soon as practicable. Employees are required to list the dates of intermittent leave in their NY PFL request, and if such dates are not known, employees must provide notice as soon as practicable.

Waivers of NY PFL coverage

In most cases, employees are not allowed to waive coverage in the NY PFL program. The only exception is if (1) an employee’s schedule is 20 hours or more per week but the employee is not expected to work 26 weeks in a 52-consecutive-week period or (2) the employee’s schedule is fewer than 20 hours per week and the employee is not expected to work 175 days in a 52- consecutive-week period. If an employee meets either of those conditions they will need to complete the Paid Family Leave Benefit Opt-out form to become exempt from the obligation to incur payroll deductions.

However, if the employee subsequently meets these thresholds, the employee will be required to make the premium contributions/payroll deductions. For 2022 (other than those who sign a waiver) employees will see a payroll deduction.

If you are eligible for a waiver, if you do not execute the waiver form, the deduction will be made.

Lincoln Financial Group

The Lincoln Financial Group will be the administrator of the NY PFL plan. Employees can call Lincoln Financial Group at 800-423-2765 for more information. Marymount Manhattan College’s policy number with Lincoln Financial Group for the NY PFL is MARYCOLLNY-BL-1684004.

 

Policy for Inclement Weather or Other School Closures/Delays  

  (Reproduced from the MMC Staff Handbook)  

It is always the intent of the College to remain open and maintain regular business and academic operations, including normal class schedules, whenever possible. If weather conditions or other emergencies make it impossible to maintain regular business and academic operations, the College may announce an adjusted schedule or school closure, defined as the cancellation of classes and the closure of offices. When making these adjustments, consideration for maintaining operations will always be balanced with the safety of the community.  

(Please note that buildings most often remain open during a school closure, and some activities may take place as scheduled and when announced.)  

Commuting students, faculty, and staff should always exercise their best judgment with regard to road and transit conditions and other safety concerns.  

In the event of an adjusted schedule or school closure, Faculty members are expected to make arrangements to make up a class, but not necessarily by scheduling an additional meeting. Because finding a suitable time is so difficult, given space and other scheduling constraints, faculty may instead assign an independent project of some variety to make up for the lost time.  

Faculty and staff will be notified of any scheduling changes via the ConnectEd system. It is imperative that all employees sign up for ConnectEd so that the College has up-to-date contact information in the case of a school closure or other emergency.  

Updates on a school delay or closure will also be available on the College website,  www.mmm.edu. Additionally, the security desk at main campus may be contacted at 212-774-0411 for information. 

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