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Strategic Plan 2017–2021

MARYMOUNT MANHATTAN COLLEGE
2017–2021 STRATEGIC PLAN
Contemporary and Compelling: Envisioning MMC’s Future

Approved by the Board on May 9, 2017

In 2016, Marymount Manhattan College (MMC) celebrated 80 years of educational excellence. Established in 1936 by the Religious of the Sacred Heart of Mary as a city extension of Marymount College in Tarrytown, New York, MMC has transformed over eight decades into an independent, coeducational, nonsectarian liberal arts college. Today, MMC continues to be a student-centered learning environment in which all members of the community—faculty, staff, administrators, and trustees alike—are committed to providing students with a compelling academic, intellectual, and social experience throughout their time at MMC, and to engaging alumni long after graduation.

MMC’s absolute commitment to student learning and success motivates this Strategic Plan for 2017 – 2021. The vision of the College that this plan advances is for MMC to become the nation’s premier destination for students seeking a contemporary and compelling small-college experience that blends a versatile liberal arts education with professional preparation and social engagement in the heart of New York City.


Process

During Fall 2016 and Spring 2017, the campus community participated in the creation of a new strategic plan that charts MMC’s course from 2017 to 2021. President Kerry Walk convened a Strategic Planning Steering Committee (SPSC) composed of faculty (both faculty-elected and appointed), staff, students, and administrators, and co-chaired by Katie LeBesco, Interim Vice President for Academic Affairs/Dean of the Faculty, and Jill Stevenson, Professor of Theatre Arts and President of the Faculty Council.

President Walk charged the SPSC to undertake a transparent and inclusive process to develop a mission-centric Strategic Plan that would set priorities and guide decisions regarding the allocation of resources for the next four years, with the overall goal of fostering educational excellence and financial sustainability. The charge was focused on five key areas: (1) enriching and differentiating an MMC education, (2) enhancing the student experience, (3) developing effective enrollment strategies, (4) strengthening and diversifying the campus community, and (5) establishing mechanisms for continuous institutional planning and improvement.

The SPSC solicited feedback from all members of the MMC community at various times during the research, synthesis, and development phases. The entire campus community was invited to a series of conversations where they could offer suggestions and responses to the research process, emerging recommendations, and the multiple drafts circulated during the spring 2017 semester. Opportunities for anonymous feedback were also provided. The committee made its research findings, reports, meeting minutes, and other planning documents available to the community through a Strategic Planning page on the MMC website and a cloud storage platform. Throughout its work, the SPSC aimed to gather the ideas and input of key College stakeholders and to maintain a transparent process.


Context

This Strategic Plan launches at a moment of significant change and great opportunity in the higher education landscape. This environment is more competitive and demanding than ever before as students seek different kinds of educational experiences in the 21st century. Small liberal arts colleges across the country struggle to balance excellence, affordability, and financial sustainability, while also demonstrating the value of the education they provide. Success in higher education requires that institutions both adapt quickly to the changing environment and fulfill the commitments they have made to students, faculty, and staff. The plan aims to leverage MMC’s unique position in order to chart a dynamic course through this challenging time for higher education.

The Strategic Plan for 2013 – 2017, which precedes the plan presented here, aimed to address many of these challenges. It also departed in significant ways from its two immediate predecessors (2002 – 2007 and 2008 – 2013), both of which focused on innovation in a period of increasing resources. In 2012, encouraged by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, MMC’s accrediting body, to develop a less comprehensive, more focused plan to address the sustainability of the College’s business model, the College approved a plan that called for the restructuring of academic offerings (e.g., the elimination of History, Political Science, and Sociology as stand-alone programs, and their incorporation into other new and existing programs), more effective utilization of technology, and more vigorous promotion of the institution. While the College has achieved many of the goals of the 2013 – 2017 plan, some are no longer relevant, given changes in the internal and external environments. Other goals are ongoing, with specific departments and academic programs that were prioritized still in need of resources (e.g., Art, Business, Creative Writing, and Information Technology) and with other programs that have continued to grow rapidly still underserved. The 2017 – 2021 plan reaffirms the College’s commitment to those programs and to resource allocation to fulfill needs that persist.

Moreover, while the 2013 – 2017 Plan led to several positive developments and curricular innovations, the consequent financial strain and reallocation of resources had a negative impact on morale and community among and between faculty and staff. In addition, the lack of a long-term strategic approach to enrollment management led to a significant increase in Theatre and Dance majors, resulting in an enrollment imbalance that is not optimal given our existing space, faculty resources, and liberal arts culture. These outcomes can be attributed in part to MMC’s history as a highly tuition-dependent institution, a fact that has hindered long-term planning and the ability to allocate resources in ways that fully support the academic enterprise. Recently, the College has addressed its tuition dependency by developing alternative revenue streams, such as a new auxiliary education program for pre-college, college, and adult learners, and by adopting a more strategic approach to enrollment management. This plan calls for a continuous strengthening of these initiatives.

The 2017 – 2021 Strategic Plan maintains the strong focus of its predecessor plan on financial sustainability, technology, and visibility, but it also provides the College with an opportunity to assess the institution’s identity— “who we are”—and how that identity enables us to adapt to the rapidly changing higher education landscape while maintaining our core values and mission. It also aims to leverage the dynamism and opportunities for innovation that new institutional leadership affords: President Kerry Walk took office in July 2015; a new Vice President for Academic Affairs/Dean of the Faculty will join MMC in July 2017; and a new Vice President for Enrollment Management is expected to join the College following a national search that is currently underway. Furthermore, in support of established priorities and the new priorities articulated in this document, planning for a comprehensive fundraising campaign is in the initial discussion stages. A College branding initiative that reflects the emerging vision and strategic direction of the College, and that will build on a brand update that has already taken place, has been incorporated into this plan. The recommendations below are therefore designed to augment and work in tandem with existing initiatives in order to ensure that the College can remain fully committed to its mission far into the future, while also remaining flexible given unforeseen changes in the external landscape.


Mission and Institutional Strengths

The 2017 – 2021 Strategic Plan is animated by the College Mission: “to educate a socially and economically diverse student body by fostering intellectual achievement and personal growth and by providing opportunities for career development. Inherent in this mission is the intent to develop an awareness of social, political, cultural, and ethical issues in the belief that this awareness will lead to concern for, participation in, and improvement of society. To accomplish this mission, the College offers a strong program in the arts and sciences for students of all ages, as well as substantial pre-professional preparation. Central to these efforts is the particular attention given to the individual student. Marymount Manhattan College seeks to be a resource and learning center for the metropolitan community.”

Since its founding, MMC has pursued this mission with determination and through a proud history of curricular development and innovative teaching. This is exemplified through a long-standing dedication to integrative pedagogies, experiential learning, social advocacy, and engagement with the city. As a result, MMC today can boast of several core institutional strengths, described below:

MMC delivers an integrated, contemporary education in a liberal arts context that transcends traditional boundaries—between theory and practice, one academic discipline and another, the curriculum and co-curriculum, and the campus and the city. With historic strengths in arts and sciences, robust and nationally recognized programs in the performing arts, growing programs in business as well as communication and media arts, and outstanding co-curricular programming intended to complete students’ educational experience, MMC is perfectly positioned to help students integrate ideas, methodologies, and skills from different disciplines and areas in order to solve problems from multiple perspectives. Through faculty and staff who are committed to participating in the latest conversations in their fields and bringing that knowledge and experience into the classroom and co-curricular programs, MMC engages students in modes of inquiry and pedagogical practices that are forward-thinking, contemporary, and intellectually stimulating. MMC students are encouraged to apply their learning to all aspects of their lives. In this way, the College cultivates socially engaged students who are able to think critically across varied bodies of knowledge, identify connections between ideas and practices, dialogue productively across difference (e.g., race, ethnicity, ability, religion, class, gender, gender identity, sexuality), and respond to social issues from informed and ethical positions.

MMC is deeply rooted in New York City. We are committed to engaging students in educational experiences around the city throughout their time at the College. As part of their courses students work and study in the archives, museums, neighborhoods, cultural institutions, and natural landscapes that surround them—experiences that help them become more informed, multidimensional thinkers and creators. Through close collaboration between the curriculum and co-curriculum in such initiatives as CityEdge, an institution-wide college-to-career initiative that deepens students’ immersion in NYC, MMC also provides students with valuable opportunities for career development that enable them to establish professional connections with individuals, institutions, companies, and other organizations in a global capital. The knowledge students gain through internships, community-engaged learning, and other experiential opportunities around New York City fosters not only intellectual achievement and personal growth, but also a socially engaged, entrepreneurial spirit that prepares MMC graduates to enter existing and emerging professional fields with confidence, and to make a significant and meaningful impact.

MMC’s small-college setting fosters close relationships between and among students, faculty, and staff. Students receive personalized support from faculty and staff that enables them to be imaginative and intentional in how they think about their own education and their future. Small classes enable students to build life-long relationships with faculty who mentor them inside and outside the classroom, and continue to do so once they are alumni. This is also true of the College’s part-time faculty, many of them working professionals who have been essential participants in the MMC community for decades. These faculty members are able to offer students unique perspectives on and access to the professional world that expands the expertise students encounter during their education. Individualized mentoring is also central to the college ethos and is particularly evident in venues such as the Higher Education Opportunity Program (HEOP), the Center for Academic Support and Tutoring (CAST), Career Services, Academic Access, and the first-year Writing Program. Moreover, our campus setting and commitment to student learning and success work in tandem to facilitate partnerships between and among faculty and staff, enriching MMC’s integrated, transdisciplinary educational environment.

MMC is committed to diversity, inclusion, and social justice, values that have always been fundamental to the College’s educational philosophy. The College’s founders were committed to reaching a diverse population in need of higher education and throughout its history MMC has maintained that vision in its approach to student recruitment, academic programming, and community-engaged initiatives. These efforts have not only expanded the student body, but also built upon the College’s rich tradition of social justice advocacy with the goal of graduating students who will make meaningful contributions as global citizens. During courses, co-curricular programs, and all-campus events, MMC students engage the larger questions of our world from different disciplinary and critical perspectives. In doing so, they learn to think beyond their own circumstances and consider their civic obligations and ethical responsibilities to the global community. This kind of reflection is a hallmark of a liberal arts education and something that MMC aims to foster not only among students, but also among faculty and staff.  


Challenges and Responses

The Strategic Plan for 2017 – 2021 responds to specific internal and external challenges by making a set of interlocking commitments—to institutional differentiation, enhanced educational space, financial sustainability, a strengthened campus community, and increased institutional visibility. These commitments, and the rationale for each, are described below.

We must more effectively define and articulate what is signature about the MMC educational experience in order to differentiate the College in the increasingly competitive landscape of higher education. Skepticism about the value of a liberal arts degree makes it imperative to articulate how an MMC education not only offers students a rich intellectual experience, but how it simultaneously provides them with a range of learning experiences in and out of the classroom that will prepare them for professional fields, graduate programs, and career paths—both those they already imagine and those they will discover in the years ahead. Making meaningful contributions as global citizens, a desired outcome of an MMC education, requires entrepreneurialism, flexibility, imagination, social advocacy, and collaboration. Our students require an education that helps them cultivate these skills in meaningful, ethical ways, and the College needs to communicate the value of this education to prospective students and families. This is the singular MMC experience that we must craft and deliver.

We must develop more effective internal systems that will alleviate strained resources, particularly with respect to educational space and its impact on curricular and co-curricular programming. Space is a significant challenge at MMC that impacts many aspects of the student, faculty, and staff experience: how program offerings overlap with courses in the General Education curriculum; scheduling and the availability of courses; unintended consequences of certain students travelling off-campus to attend classes; access to different kinds of learning experiences; interaction with full-time faculty in the classroom; opportunities to develop student cohorts within majors; the ability of faculty and staff to partner across departments and divisions; opportunities for pedagogical experimentation; faculty and staff working conditions; and students’ sense of belonging at the college. This is especially the case given our need for smart classrooms, as well as adequate studios and practice-based classrooms. Developing a comprehensive, research-based facilities and space plan that is supported by investments in technology and infrastructure will help improve student persistence and completion rates, balance enrollment across academic programs, and enhance the overall learning environment.

We must achieve long-term financial sustainability not only by taking a strategic approach to undergraduate enrollment management but also by continuing to pursue alternative revenue streams, such as the auxiliary education program currently in development, and by implementing a continuous strategic planning model. Many of our current processes, such as those for enrollment management, program development, and budgeting, are neither strategic nor comprehensive in approach. We must adopt a longer-term undergraduate enrollment plan that includes enhanced and ongoing communication and collaborative planning between academic and administrative departments of the College. The College also recognizes that it cannot continue to rely almost exclusively on undergraduate tuition-and-fee revenue and has therefore begun to develop an auxiliary education program that is a natural outgrowth of MMC’s academic mission. This program will provide additional revenue but without straining space, faculty, and staff resources. In addition, the College will soon launch its first Master’s Program, in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology. As with the auxiliary education program, this endeavor builds on MMC’s existing strengths and was informed by thorough research into the educational marketplace as well as the College’s ability to provide a quality, competitive program. These kinds of initiatives are essential to MMC’s long-term stability and must be supported by a continuous strategic planning model that involves regularly assessing the external and internal landscapes and establishing nimble, financially sustainable, research-driven processes for responding tactically to changes in those landscapes.

We must establish structures and policies that cultivate a more diverse, equitable, and development-minded culture among faculty and staff in order to attract, support, and retain talent. The staff and faculty of MMC are deeply committed to the college mission and to their students; yet financial strain and the reallocation of resources that resulted from the 2013 –

2017 Strategic Plan have had a negative impact on morale and community among and between staff and faculty. As a result, the College has attempted with difficulty to retain talent in certain areas, to remain competitive with respect to compensation, and to provide necessary support for faculty research and pedagogical innovation. In addition, the College has struggled to attract a more diverse applicant pool for faculty and staff positions. MMC recognizes that diversity cultivates not only principled deliberation, but also intellectual rigor. Individuals working in heterogeneous, inclusive communities think more creatively and demonstrate more flexibility in problem solving. Consequently, not only must the College strengthen its commitment to supporting a diverse student population, but MMC’s mission to develop social, political, cultural, and ethical awareness also demands a racially, ethnically, physically, and culturally diverse faculty and staff.

We must increase MMC’s visibility regionally, nationally, and internationally in order to thrive in the current landscape of higher education. MMC can no longer remain a well-kept secret on the Upper East Side. With competition for an ever-shrinking population of eligible students growing more intense each year, and the perceived value of a college education no longer assumed, the College must implement a comprehensive and vision-driven marketing, recruitment, and promotional plan. This plan must strategically position MMC in the academic marketplace and make the College’s unique value proposition clear to those outside the MMC community. It must be driven by the strengths of the College so that we deliver on the promises we make to prospective students and their families, and will necessitate strengthening communication between the academic and administrative divisions of the College.

We present the Strategic Plan for 2017 – 2021 as the College’s ongoing effort to remain relevant in challenging times for higher education and in an increasingly complex world. Contemporary and Compelling: Envisioning MMC’s Future has roots in our fundamental commitment to blending a liberal arts education with career development and social engagement. This plan constitutes a set of recommendations designed to build on MMC’s manifest strengths in order to purposefully navigate present challenges and carry out the College’s mission-based commitments.


Strategic Goals and Objectives for 2017 – 2021

MMC has identified the following five strategic goals, with objectives related to each goal and a set of tactics for achieving each objective. A matrix that details the timeline, assignment of responsibility, and areas of impact for these goals, objectives, and strategies is below.


GOAL I: Craft a singular MMC experience
.

Further develop a contemporary, cross-disciplinary, and cutting-edge curriculum that is integrated with vibrant co-curricular programming and embedded in New York City in order to motivate students to enroll in MMC, thrive at the College through graduation, and participate in the MMC community as alumni.

Objectives and Tactics:

I.1  Augment and develop CityEdge programming to support students throughout their education at MMC and as valued alumni.

  1. Facilitate more robust communication among faculty, academic departments, and Career Services.
  2. Strengthen relationships and develop partnerships with professional institutions across the city and particularly those in our immediate vicinity on the Upper East Side.
  3. Assess student learning, persistence/completion, and professional outcomes in order to deliver a more integrated curricular and co-curricular student experience.
  4. Deploy High-Impact Practices [HIPs] (particularly, community-engaged learning) and professional preparation effectively across curricular and co-curricular programming.

I.2 Develop more effective, innovative, and student-centered methods of educational delivery.

  1. Assess what courses students are already taking online both at MMC and at other institutions and innovate the curriculum accordingly.
  2. Model, assess the value of, and implement alternative course credit structures that will support pedagogical and curricular innovation and alternative teaching models.
  3. Transition suitable courses to alternative delivery modes and make curricular changes accordingly.
  4. Establish formal, efficient communication structures between IT and academic programs in order to plan for and support curricular development and educational delivery.
  5. Model and implement General Education curriculum changes that will resolve issues related to scheduling, pre-requisites, and course availability; and that innovate beyond a strictly course-based model.
  6. Develop and embed social justice education (i.e., race, class, disability, gender, sexuality, religious belief, etc.) and inclusivity skill-building workshops throughout curricular and co-curricular programming that span a student’s time at the College.
  7. Research and implement as appropriate alternative divisional structures that are efficient, effective, and integrated with respect to educational delivery.

I.3     Enhance support services for students and alumni.

  1. Identify under-resourced subpopulations within the student body (e.g., first-generation college students, students of color, international students), assess existing programs that serve the needs of these groups, and adjust resources across the College to provide these students with adequate support.
  2. Expand resources to more effectively and efficiently support students with learning disabilities and/or mental health needs.
  3. Recognize and leverage the talent, experience, and networks of alumni by encouraging their participation in the MMC community through reciprocal relationships that benefit both alumni and students.
  4. Develop stronger connections between MMC’s Bedford Hills College Program and the 71st St. campus.


GOAL II: Enhance the MMC teaching and learning environment.

Create an inviting, accessible environment that promotes student learning and engagement, allows for pedagogical innovation and experimentation, supports the work of faculty and staff, and accurately conveys the contemporary, versatile educational experience that MMC offers.

Objectives and Tactics:

II.1:   Develop a facilities and space plan that optimally allocates and defines existing space, and identifies new space as necessary.

  1. Undertake a comprehensive assessment of campus and off-campus spaces, and College space needs, as the first steps in developing a facilities and space plan.
  2. Reallocate and redesign the campus footprint based upon the facilities and space plan.
  3. Create more attractive and welcoming classroom, studio, student, and community spaces through new paint, more inviting furniture, and other low-tech and low-cost improvements.
  4. Enhance and modernize existing classroom and studio spaces with upgraded equipment and technology.
  5. Update the College’s capital projects plan to prioritize the goals of this strategic plan.

II.2:   Invest in technology and infrastructure enhancements in order to effectively support and facilitate student learning, curricular innovation, and the working conditions of faculty and staff.

  1. Invest in software that provides accurate course demand analysis.
  2. Invest in scheduling software to optimize room utilization.
  3. Automate forms to improve workflow capabilities.
  4. Implement Ellucian self-service and student planning modules.
  5. Implement digital imaging in Student Services to manage content and records securely.
  6. Invest in instructional technology through material resources, support staff, and faculty training.


GOAL III: Foster student success and fiscal health.

Develop intentional, research-driven approaches to managing undergraduate enrollment, to undertaking a fundraising plan, and to pursuing alternative revenue streams in order to optimize MMC’s resources and enrollment, deliver a high-quality college education, promote student persistence and completion, and achieve financial sustainability.

Objectives and Tactics:

III.1: Establish a long-term Strategic Enrollment Plan (SEP) that will accomplish the following: align enrollment strategies with the College’s mission and current state, as well as the changing environment; promote student persistence and completion; adopt a return-on-investment (ROI) and action-item approach to planning; establish realistic, quantifiable enrollment goals; and foster predictable long-term enrollment and fiscal health.

  1. Develop action plans in alignment with the specific priorities of this Strategic Plan to form the basis of the SEP.
  2. Explore the value, budgetary impact, and financial aid implications of alternatives to the current 12-15 credit full-time Fall/Spring pricing structure, such as moving to a full-time tuition zone of 12-18 credits for the Fall and Spring semesters or discounting non-Fall and non-Spring terms to promote year-round learning, and implement as appropriate.
  3. Implement an integrative and interactive dashboard reporting system that allows all units to track ongoing performance against Key Performance Indicators (KPI).
  4. Continue to research and pursue alternative revenue streams that align with the academic mission and existing resources, in particular auxiliary education programming.
  5. Establish a continuous institutional strategic planning model that intersects with SEP, involves periodic environmental scans and ongoing assessment of goals and priorities, allows for nimble response to changes in the higher education environment, and results in continuous institutional effectiveness.

III.2:  Restructure the program development process to put faculty and academic departments in formal conversation with the enrollment leadership team and develop a clear process to assure that resources (e.g., faculty and staff, educational spaces, recruitment support, technology) are available for new programs when approved.

  1. Assess those programs prioritized within the 2013–2017 Strategic Plan and those that have been created since, and determine resource allocation in light of student needs, the current state of the College, and the changing environment.
  2. Develop in phases those pedagogy and curriculum innovation proposals that align with the specific priorities of this Strategic Plan.
  3. Establish research-driven enrollment targets for majors that involve input from faculty and the enrollment management team.

III.3:  Develop and undertake a comprehensive fundraising campaign.

  1. Develop a fundraising plan that begins with a feasibility study and that aligns with existing priorities and the priorities developed in this Strategic Plan.
  2. Identify shared strategies for involving all MMC constituencies, including trustees, faculty, staff, administrators, alumni, friends, parents, corporations, and foundations in the fundraising campaign.
  3. Develop an appropriate staffing structure to launch and sustain a comprehensive campaign.
  4. Launch a fundraising campaign with agreed-upon priorities and financial goals endorsed by the College community that include such items as student scholarships (merit- and need-based), the Bedford Hills College Program endowment, and other funding priorities.


GOAL IV: Attract, value, and support faculty and staff talent.

Recognize and cultivate excellence by adopting systems and structures that foster an intellectually rich, diverse, inclusive, and ethical community.

Objectives and Tactics:

IV.1: Support ongoing development and recognize achievement among faculty and staff.

  1. Provide non-union staff and faculty with competitive compensation using up-to-date benchmark data.
  2. Undertake a staff market study in order to establish up-to-date salary bands, and reexamine and adjust, as necessary, AAUP faculty salary and compensation benchmarks.
  3. Promote and support staff development, ongoing training, retention, and success.
  4. Model and implement, as appropriate, ways to reduce full-time faculty teaching load on an occasional or regular basis.
  5. Bolster institutional support for faculty scholarship and creative activity.
  6. Establish ways to encourage faculty development with respect to College service and institutional leadership, especially at the upper ranks.
  7. Develop more readily available resources and trainings for part-time faculty as well as more formal structures for including part-time faculty in College initiatives and activities.

IV.2: Cultivate a more diverse and inclusive community of staff and faculty.

  1. Develop and implement a recruitment and retention plan aimed at diversifying the College’s faculty and staff, especially in terms of race, ability, and ethnicity.
  2. Implement workshops for full-time and part-time faculty and staff on issues related to diversity and inclusivity, and on how to embed inclusivity skill-building into academic courses and student events.
  3. Assess MMC’s policy regarding paid family leave in relation to peer institutions, and amend as necessary.


GOAL V: Make the MMC experience visible.

Develop a comprehensive marketing, outreach, recruitment, and promotional plan in order to increase MMC’s visibility regionally, nationally, and internationally.

Objectives and Tactics:

V.1:   Launch a comprehensive branding initiative that reflects the strategic direction of the College as reflected in this plan.

  1. Establish formal, efficient communication structures between Institutional Advancement and the academic programs.
  2. Create a targeted marketing plan that exposes prospective students to all of MMC’s academic programs, the career opportunities and professional preparation supplied across the curriculum, and the value of an MMC education.
  3. Create online platforms that highlight student achievement across academic programs, CityEdge activities, and experiential learning opportunities.

V.2:   Enhance the College’s student recruitment models to more effectively market the singular MMC experience, effectively showcase the full range of program offerings, and successfully compete for students in a rapidly evolving higher education environment (e.g., increasing for-profit education, online and accelerated degree programs, competency-based learning, and “free tuition” at public institutions).

  1. Utilize print and electronic marketing channels to highlight student and alumni achievement, professional preparation, and the singular MMC experience.
  2. Create stronger partnerships with feeder high schools and community colleges in the primary and secondary markets.
  3. Foster relationships with alumni, current students, and parents to serve as College ambassadors and contribute to recruitment efforts.

Implementation Tactics

The following matrix is a guide for how the goals of this Strategic Plan will be achieved during the period 2017 – 2021. Implementation teams will develop action plans detailing costs and benefits, and identify sources of funding, as needed. The assessment indicators below represent a preliminary list. Implementation teams will determine a more refined, specific set of KPI and PI as part of their work. Several of the tactics listed below form the core of seven Strategic Enrollment Plan (SEP) action plans, which are listed in the next section.

Responsible Parties: VPAA (Vice President for Academic Affairs/Dean of the Faculty); VPSA (Vice President for Student Affairs); VPEM (Vice President for Enrollment Management); EVPAF (Executive Vice President for Administration and Finance); VPIA (Vice President for Institutional Advancement); AVPSI+ (Assistant Vice President for Strategic Initiatives, Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer, and Title IX Coordinator).


GOAL I: Craft a singular MMC experience

Objective I.1: Augment and develop CityEdge programming to support students throughout their education at MMC and as valued alumni.

 

Tactic

Timeline

Responsible Parties

Areas of

Impact

Assessment Indicators (KPI/PI)

a

Facilitate more robust communication among faculty, academic departments, and Career Services.

2017-2018

VPAA

 

AVPSI+

 

VPSA

Student Experience

 

Program Quality

Internship rate; student satisfaction results; graduation rates; job placement and graduate school placement rates

b

Strengthen relationships and develop partnerships with professional institutions across the city and particularly those in our immediate vicinity on the Upper East Side.

2017-2018

 

VPAA

 

AVPSI+

 

VPSA

Enrollment

 

Student Experience

 

Program Quality

FT headcount; Internship rate; student satisfaction results; graduation rates; job placement and graduate school placement rates

c

Assess student learning, persistence/completion, and professional outcomes in order to deliver a more integrated curricular and co-curricular student experience.

2018-2019

VPAA

 

AVPSI+

 

Faculty Council

Student Experience

 

Program Quality

Internship rate; student satisfaction results; graduation rates; job placement and graduate school placement rates

d

Deploy High-Impact Practices [HIPs] (particularly, community-engaged learning) and professional preparation effectively across curricular and co-curricular programming.

2018-2019

 

VPAA

 

AVPSI+

 

Faculty Council

 

VPSA

Enrollment

 

Student Experience

 

Program Quality

FT headcount; Internship rate; student satisfaction results; graduation rates; job placement and graduate school placement rates

Objective I.2: Develop more effective, innovative, and student-centered methods of educational delivery.

 

Tactic

Timeline

Responsible Parties

Areas of

Impact

Assessment Indicators (KPI/PI)

a

Assess what courses students are already taking online both at MMC and at other institutions and innovate the curriculum accordingly.

2017-2018

VPAA

 

Faculty Council

Space

Classroom utilization;

b

Model, assess the value of, and implement alternative course credit structures that will support pedagogical and curricular innovation and alternative teaching models.

2017-2018

VPAA

 

Faculty Council

Enrollment

 

Student Experience

 

Space

 

Program Quality

 

 

 

LA+ headcount; Student/faculty ratio in majors; FT teaching rate by dept.; Internship rate; classroom and specialized utilization rates; retention 1st to 3rd year, program reviews

c

Transition suitable courses to alternative delivery modes and make curricular changes accordingly.

2018-2019

VPAA

 

Faculty Council

 

EVPAF

Student Experience

 

Space

 

Program Quality

Student satisfaction results; classroom utilization rates; 1st-3rd year retention

d

Establish formal, efficient communication structures between IT and academic programs in order to plan for and support curricular development and educational delivery.

2018-2019

VPAA

 

EVPAF

Student Satisfaction

 

Space Utilization

Student Satisfaction;

classroom utilization rates; Faculty/staff satisfaction

e

Model and implement General Education curriculum changes that will resolve issues related to scheduling, pre-requisites, and course availability; and that innovate beyond a strictly course-based model. [see note below]

Model: 2018-2019

 

Implement: 2019-2021

Faculty Council

 

VPAA

Enrollment

 

Student Experience

 

Program Quality

PA/LA+ mix; LA+ enrollment; FT faculty/student rate; FT faculty teaching rate by department; student satisfaction; 1st-3rd year retention; faculty satisfaction

f

Develop and embed social justice education (i.e., race, class, disability, gender, sexuality, religious belief, etc.) and inclusivity skill-building workshops throughout curricular and co-curricular programming that span a student’s time at the College.

2018-2019

 

VPAA

 

Faculty Council

 

AVPSI+

 

VPSA

Diversity

 

Student Experience

 

Program Quality

Diversity of student population; Climate survey results; student satisfaction results; program reviews

 

g

Research and implement as appropriate alternative divisional structures that are efficient, effective, and integrated with respect to educational delivery.

2020-2021

VPAA

 

Faculty Council

Program Quality

 

Student Experience

Program reviews; faculty satisfaction; student satisfaction rates

Note for I.2.e: Revisions to the General Education curriculum should include the following research and considerations: the value and feasibility of having Gen Ed requirements at both the lower and upper levels, and research alternative models that might work better given enrollment numbers, scheduling constraints, and required pre-requisites for courses; how changes would impact the sustainability of courses in smaller majors; how to embed CityEdge initiatives within the Gen Ed; the value of adopting alternative modes of delivery (e.g., online courses, hybrid courses, linked courses, co-teaching) where appropriate; the impacts on the College Honors Program (CHP) and how best to restructure the CHP, as necessary, in consultation with the CHP director; the technology necessary to support educational delivery; how revisions would impact transfer students and transfer credit applicability; a change in nomenclature that would reinforce the shared, communal nature of the curriculum (e.g., Shared Curriculum rather than Gen Ed).

Objective I.3: Enhance support services for students and alumni.

 

Tactic

Timeline

Responsible Parties

Areas of

Impact

Assessment Indicators (KPI/PI)

a

Identify under-resourced subpopulations within the student body (e.g., first-generation college students, students of color, international students), assess existing programs that serve the needs of these groups, and adjust resources across the College to provide these students with adequate support.

2017-2019

VPAA

 

VPSA

 

AVPSI+

Diversity

 

Program Quality

 

Student Experience

 

Enrollment

Climate survey results; 1st-2nd year retention; student experience results; NSSE results; student satisfaction; full-time enrollment

b

Expand resources to more effectively and efficiently support students with learning disabilities and/or mental health needs.

2018-2020

VPSA

Program Quality

 

Student Experience

 

Space Utilization

Graduation rate; Student satisfaction; specialized space utilization

c

Recognize and leverage the talent, experience, and networks of alumni by encouraging their participation in the MMC community through reciprocal relationships that benefit both alumni and students.

2018-2020

Cabinet

 

VPIA

Market Position

 

Fiscal Health

 

Student Experience

Market Penetration Rate; Alumni giving rate; student satisfaction; alumni giving rate

d

Develop stronger connections between MMC’s Bedford Hills College Program and the 71st St. campus.

2019-2020

Cabinet

 

VPAA

Program Quality

 

Program reviews


GOAL II: Enhance the MMC Teaching and Learning Environment

Objective II.1: Develop a facilities and space plan that optimally allocates and defines existing space, and identifies new space as necessary.

 

Tactic

Timeline

Responsible Parties

Areas of

Impact

Assessment Indicators (KPI/PI)

a

Undertake a comprehensive assessment of campus and off-campus spaces, and College space needs, as the first steps in developing a facilities and space plan. [see note below]

2017-2018

Cabinet

Space Utilization

 

Student Experience

 

Program Quality

Overall allocation of campus space by category; Student satisfaction; Faculty/staff satisfaction

b

Reallocate and redesign the campus footprint based upon the facilities and space plan.

 

2018-2021

Cabinet

Space Utilization

 

Student Experience

 

Program Quality

Overall allocation of campus space by category; Student satisfaction; Faculty/staff satisfaction

c

Create more attractive and welcoming classroom, studio, student, and community spaces through new paint, more inviting furniture, and other low-tech and low-cost improvements.

2018-2020

 

EVPAF

Enrollment

 

Student experience

 

Program Quality

Yield rate; Student satisfaction; 1st-2nd year retention

d

Enhance and modernize existing classroom and studio spaces with upgraded equipment and technology.

2018-2021

EVPAF

 

VPAA

 

EVPAF

Enrollment

 

Space Utilization

 

Program Quality

Yield rate; Classroom utilization rates; 1st-3rd year retention

e

Update the College’s capital projects plan to prioritize the goals of this strategic plan.

2018-2019 and then annually

EVPAF

Space Utilization

 

Student experience

Overall allocation of campus space by category; Student satisfaction

Note for II.1.a: The process for space assessment and plan development should include surveying faculty, staff, and students about how they use their existing educational and work spaces, and should address the following priorities: improve prospective students’ and families’ initial impressions of MMC’s physical space; bring attention to the existing professional learning spaces on campus (e.g., Hewitt Gallery, Ruth Smadbeck Communication and Learning Center, Theresa Lang Center for Producing); adapt the built environment to improve access for people with disabilities; create spaces that support students who spend extended time on campus; investigate alternative models for managing office space to open up educational and social space for students and to support the work of faculty and staff; reallocate and redesign the library in order to support innovative teaching and learning, to facilitate the different ways students access sources and learning materials, and to provide a variety of different kinds of spaces; establish formal venues for exhibiting the work of full-time and part-time faculty, students, staff, and alumni, and showcasing its relationship to the curriculum and educational mission; accommodate the space needs of academic and administrative offices and programs; assess how off-campus classroom space rentals might be undertaken in ways that ease scheduling demands but without disproportionately impacting certain student populations.

Objective II.2: Invest in technology and infrastructure enhancements in order to effectively support and facilitate student learning, curricular innovation, and the working conditions of faculty and staff.

 

Tactic

Timeline

Responsible Parties

Areas of

Impact

Assessment Indicators (KPI/PI)

a

Invest in software that provides accurate course demand analysis.

2017-2018

VPAA

 

EVPAF

Program Quality

 

Student Experience

1st-3rd retention; graduation rates; student satisfaction

b

Invest in scheduling software to optimize room utilization.

2017-2018

VPAA

 

EVPAF

Program Quality

 

Space

 

Student Experience

1st-3rd retention; graduation rates; Instructional space utilization; Student satisfaction

c

Automate forms to improve workflow capabilities.

2017-2018

Cabinet

Student Experience

 

Program Quality

Student satisfaction; 1st-2nd year retention

d

Implement Ellucian self-service and student planning modules.

2018-2019

VPAA

 

VPEM

Enrollment

 

Program Quality

 

Student Experience

FT headcount; 1st-3rd retention; graduation rates; student satisfaction

e

Implement digital imaging in Student Services to manage content and records securely.

2018-2019

VPAA

 

VPEM

 

EVPAF

Space Utilization

 

Fiscal Health

Overall allocation of space; Net operating revenue

f

Invest in instructional technology through material resources, support staff, and faculty training.

 

2019-2021

VPAA

 

EVPAF

Program Quality

 

Student Experience

 


GOAL III
: Foster Student Success and Fiscal Health

Objective III.1: Establish a long-term Strategic Enrollment Plan (SEP) that will accomplish the following: align enrollment strategies with the College’s mission and current state, as well as the changing environment; promote student persistence and completion; adopt a return-on-investment (ROI) and action-item approach to planning; establish realistic, quantifiable enrollment goals; and foster predictable long-term enrollment and fiscal health.

 

Tactic

Timeline

Responsible Parties

Areas of

Impact

Assessment Indicators (KPI/PI)

a

Develop action plans in alignment with the specific priorities of this Strategic Plan to form the basis of the SEP.

2017-2018

Cabinet

Enrollment

 

Fiscal Health

Overall enrollment;

Net operating revenue

b

Explore the value, budgetary impact, and financial aid implications of alternatives to the current 12-15 credit full-time Fall/Spring pricing structure, such as moving to a full-time tuition zone of 12-18 credits for the Fall and Spring semesters or discounting non-Fall and non-Spring terms to promote year-round learning, and implement as appropriate.

2017-2018

VPAA

 

VPEM

 

EVPAF

Enrollment

 

Fiscal Health

 

Program Quality

FT headcount; Net operating revenue; Graduation rates

c

Implement an integrative and interactive dashboard reporting system that allows all units to track ongoing performance against Key Performance Indicators (KPI).

2017-2018

Cabinet

Enrollment

 

Program Quality

 

Fiscal Health

Total enrollment; 1st-3rd year retention; graduation rates; Net operating revenue

d

Continue to research and pursue alternative revenue streams that align with the academic mission and existing resources, in particular auxiliary education programming.

2017-2018

VPAA

 

VPEM

 

EVPAF

Fiscal Health

 

Enrollment

Net operating revenue; PT headcount

e

Establish a continuous institutional strategic planning model that intersects with SEP, involves periodic environmental scans and ongoing assessment of goals and priorities, allows for nimble response to changes in the higher education environment, and results in continuous institutional effectiveness.

2017-2018

Cabinet

Enrollment

 

Program Quality

 

Fiscal Health

 

Student Experience

 

Space Utilization

Total headcount; graduation rates; net operating revenue; CFI; student satisfaction; overall allocation of campus space

Objective III.2: Restructure the program development process to put faculty and academic departments in formal conversation with the enrollment leadership team and develop a clear process to assure that resources (e.g., faculty and staff, educational spaces, recruitment support, technology) are available for new programs when approved.

 

Tactic

Timeline

Responsible Parties

Areas of

Impact

Assessment Indicators (KPI/PI)

a

Assess those programs prioritized within the 2013-2017 Strategic Plan and those that have been created since, and determine resource allocation in light of student needs, the current state of the College, and the changing environment.

2017-2018

VPAA

 

Faculty Council

Enrollment

 

Student Satisfaction

Total enrollment; PA/LA + mix;

Student Satisfaction; FT faculty/Student ratios; FT teaching rate by dept.

b

Develop in phases those pedagogy and curriculum innovation proposals that align with the specific priorities of this Strategic Plan.

2017-2021

VPAA

 

Faculty Council

Enrollment

 

Market Position

Total enrollment; PA/LA + mix; Market penetration

c

Establish research-driven enrollment targets for majors that involve input from faculty and the enrollment management team.

2017-2018

VPAA

 

VPEM

Enrollment

 

Space

Total enrollment; Yield rate; Allocation of instructional space

Objective III.3: Develop and undertake a comprehensive fundraising campaign.

 

Tactic

Timeline

Responsible Parties

Areas of

Impact

Assessment Indicators (KPI/PI)

a

Develop a fundraising plan that begins with a feasibility study and that aligns with existing priorities and the priorities developed in this Strategic Plan.

2017-2019

Cabinet

Fiscal Health

Net operating revenue

b

Identify shared strategies for involving all MMC constituencies, including trustees, faculty, staff, administrators, alumni, friends, parents, corporations, and foundations in the fundraising campaign.

2018-2019

VPIA

 

VPAA

Fiscal Health

 

Net operating revenue

c

Develop an appropriate staffing structure to launch and sustain a comprehensive campaign.

2018-2019

VPIA

 

Cabinet

Fiscal Health

Net operating revenue

d

Launch a fundraising campaign with agreed-upon priorities and financial goals endorsed by the College community that include such items as student scholarships (merit- and need-based), the Bedford Hills College Program endowment, and other funding priorities.

2019-2021

VPIA

Fiscal Health

Net operating revenue


GOAL IV: Attract, value, and support faculty and staff talent

Objective IV.1: Support ongoing development and recognize achievement among faculty and staff.

 

Tactic

Timeline

Responsible Parties

Areas of

Impact

Assessment Indicators (KPI/PI)

a

Provide non-union staff and faculty with competitive compensation using up-to-date benchmark data.

2017-2018

Cabinet

 

Faculty Council

Student experience

 

Program Quality

 

Diversity

FT teaching rate by department; Faculty salary and total compensation; Proportion of FT faculty to tenure line faculty to PT faculty; Race/ethnicity proportions

b

Undertake a staff market study in order to establish up-to-date salary bands, and reexamine and adjust, as necessary, AAUP faculty salary and compensation benchmarks.

2017-2018

Cabinet

 

Faculty Council

Student experience

 

Program Quality

 

Diversity

FT teaching rate by department; Faculty salary and total compensation; Proportion of FT faculty to tenure line faculty to PT faculty; Race/ethnicity proportions

c

Promote and support staff development, ongoing training, retention, and success.

2017-2018

Cabinet

 

Diversity

 

Student Experience

Race/ethnicity proportions; Climate survey results; Staff/student and staff/faculty ratios

d

Model and implement as appropriate ways to reduce full-time faculty teaching load on an occasional or regular basis. [see note below]

2018-2019

Cabinet

 

Faculty Council

 

AVPSI+

Student experience

 

Program quality

Student satisfaction results; NSSE results; Job placement rate; Graduate school placement rate; Program reviews; Faculty satisfaction

e

Bolster institutional support for faculty scholarship and creative activity.

2018-2019

VPAA

Enrollment

 

Program Quality

 

Total enrollment; graduation rates; faculty satisfaction; program reviews

 

f

Establish ways to encourage faculty development with respect to College service and institutional leadership, especially at the upper ranks.

2018-2019

VPAA

 

Faculty Council

Program Quality

 

1st-3rd year retention; Student satisfaction

g

Develop more readily available resources and trainings for part-time faculty as well as more formal structures for including part-time faculty in College initiatives and activities.

2018-2019

VPAA

 

Faculty Council

Program Quality

 

Student Experience

Student retention

 

Student satisfaction

Note for IV.1.d: Implementation strategies might include alternative models for calculating faculty course load (e.g., course releases, banking models, etc.) in order to support faculty as they innovate pedagogy, experiment with course design to include more HIPs and CityEdge connections, and expand their professional activities, especially in ways that enhance their teaching.

Objective IV.2: Cultivate a more diverse and inclusive community of staff and faculty.

 

Tactic

Timeline

Responsible Parties

Areas of

Impact

Assessment Indicators (KPI/PI)

a

Develop and implement a recruitment and retention plan aimed at diversifying the College’s faculty and staff, especially in terms of race, ability, and ethnicity.

2017-2018

 

VPAA

 

AVPSI+

 

EVPAF

Diversity

 

Student Experience

 

Enrollment

race/ethnicity/disability proportions; student satisfaction; NSSE results; FT enrollment

 

b

Implement workshops for full-time and part-time faculty and staff on issues related to diversity and inclusivity, and on how to embed inclusivity skill-building into academic courses and student events.

2018-2019

VPAA

 

AVPSI+

 

EVPAF

Enrollment

 

Diversity

 

Student Experience

1st-3rd year retention; Climate survey; race/ethnicity/disability proportions; student satisfaction results

c

Assess MMC’s policy regarding paid family leave in relation to peer institutions, and amend as necessary.

2018-2019

EVPAF

Diversity

Faculty/staff satisfaction; gender proportions


GOAL V: Make the MMC Experience Visible

Objective V.1: Launch a comprehensive branding initiative that reflects the strategic direction of the College as reflected in this plan.

 

Tactic

Timeline

Responsible Parties

Areas of

Impact

Assessment Indicators (KPI/PI)

a

Establish formal, efficient communication structures between Institutional Advancement and the academic programs.

2017-2018

VPIA

 

VPAA

Market Position

 

Fiscal Health

Market penetration rates; alumni giving

b

Create a targeted marketing plan that exposes prospective students to all of MMC’s academic programs, as well as the career opportunities and professional preparation supplied across the curriculum and programs.

2018-2019

VPIA

 

VPEM

 

VPAA

 

VPSA

Enrollment

 

Market Position

Total enrollment; PA/LA+ mix; market penetration rates

c

Create online platforms that highlight student achievement across academic programs, CityEdge activities, and experiential learning opportunities.

2018-2019

VPIA

 

VPAA

 

AVPSI+

 

VPSA

Enrollment

 

Student Experience

 

 

Total enrollment; PA/LA+ mix; internship rates; student satisfaction

Objective V.2: Enhance the College’s student recruitment models to more effectively market the singular MMC experience, effectively showcase the full range of program offerings, and successfully compete for students in a rapidly evolving higher education environment (e.g., increasing for-profit education, online and accelerated degree programs, competency-based learning, and “free tuition” at public institutions).

 

Tactic

Timeline

Responsible Parties

Areas of

Impact

Assessment Indicators (KPI/PI)

a

Utilize print and electronic marketing channels to highlight student and alumni achievement, professional preparation, and the singular MMC experience.

2017-2018

VPEM

 

VPIA

 

AVPSI+

 

VPSA

Enrollment

 

Market Position

 

Fiscal Health

Total Enrollment; PA/LA+ mix; market penetration rates; web traffic; alumni giving rates

b

Create stronger partnerships with feeder high schools and community colleges in the primary and secondary markets.

2017-2018

VPEM

Enrollment

 

Market Position

Total enrollment; PA/LA+ mix; market penetration rates

c

Foster relationships with alumni, current students, and parents to serve as College ambassadors and contribute to recruitment efforts.

2018-2019

VPEM

 

VPIA

Enrollment

 

Market Position

Total Enrollment; PA/LA+ mix; penetration rates


Foundational Strategic Enrollment Plan (SEP) Action Plans

To support the 2017-2021 Strategic Plan’s emphasis on fiscal sustainability and continuous strategic planning, the College’s enrollment team is currently developing a set of seven action plans that will form the foundation of the Strategic Enrollment Plan (SEP). The action plans, which align with specific priorities identified in this Strategic Plan, are expected to have direct and immediate impact on enrollment and revenue. The seven SEP action plans, with the corresponding goals, objectives, and tactics, are as follows:

  1. Alternative course delivery plan, including online courses (I.2.a, c)
  2. Internship, community engagement, and High-Impact Practices participation plan (I.1.d)
  3. Plan to provide support services to student subpopulations, in particular first generation, students of color, international students, and students with disabilities (I.3.a, b, d)
  4. Technology support plan (II.1.d, II.2.a-f, III.1.c)
  5. Comprehensive transfer student recruitment plan (V.2.b)
  6. Auxiliary education plan (III.1.d)
  7. Plan to balance enrollment between Performing Arts and Liberal Arts+ students (III.2.a-c)